Writing, Publishing and Bookselling

Notes for the Manuscript

Notes for the Manuscript

Albert Cook Myers’ collection of William Penn materials, 1668-1955 (Chester County Historical Society):  Albert Cook Myers (1874-1960) was a Pennsylvania historian, who dedicated his life’s work to the identification, study and organization of William Penn’s published writings and personal papers. Beginning in 1910, after securing an endorsement from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, he set out to publish The Complete Works of William Penn.  All told, Myers devoted fifty years of his life to this project. Though his publication goals were never realized, he assembled a massive and notable body of information about William Penn. To complete his studies, Myers travelled abroad and throughout the United States. As a result of his efforts, he came to be regarded as an expert on the topic and often spoke publicly on the life and times of William Penn. The Albert Cook Myers research collection of William Penn materials contains the information gathered by Myers in his pursuit to thoroughly research and publish a volume documenting the complete writings of William Penn. Researchers will find Myers’ notes, transcriptions, photocopies of documents, newspaper clippings, various author articles, first editions and other early editions of Penn’s works, picture postcards of places related to Penn, and photos and original manuscript material. The bulk of the collection is “The Manuscript” series, which focuses on Myer’s work on Penn’s own writings. Researchers should be aware that the bulk of the collection is Myers’ notes and only a small portion is original manuscript material related to Penn. The collection spans the dates of 1645 to 1960, however, the bulk of the material was collected and created by Myers from 1910 to 1960.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Albert Cook Myers collection of William Penn materials using the collection guide »

Christina of Sweden

Christina of Sweden

Anne Hampton Brewster papers and letters, 1777-1892 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Anne Hampton Brewster (1818-1892) was an American novelist, journalist and foreign correspondent who defied contemporary conceptions of womanhood and society during the nineteenth century. The papers date from 1777 to 1892, with the majority of the materials dating from 1845 to 1892. The materials primarily consist of diaries, journals, commonplace books, correspondence, newspaper clippings, notes about her writings and drafts of her writings. The materials document Anne Hampton Brewster’s personal life with friends and family, and they document her professional life as a journalist and writer.
Explore the Anne Hampton Brewster papers and letters using the collection guide »

Charles Morice papers, 1862-1970 (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Resource Center): Charles Morice was a prolific spokesman for the Symbolist movement. He was at times a poet, playwright, shipping clerk, literary critic, professor of literature, and lecturer. He collaborated in the founding of Mercure de France, the “organ of the purest Symbolism.” He attended Stéphene Maliarmé’s “Tuesdays,” weekly social gatherings of Symbolist writers and painters. While writing for Le Matin he was assigned to cover the death penalty debate. He corresponded with many famous artists on their thoughts on the death penalty. He also collaborated with the painter Paul Gauguin on his book Noa Noa, and with Auguste Rodin on his book Les Cathedrals des France. Morice wrote and had several unfinished manuscripts when he died on March 18, 1919. The collection of Morice’s papers comprises nine boxes and sixteen volumes. The collection is divided into printed material, his journals and notebooks which were called Petite Journaux, correspondence, and Morice manuscripts. Included in the correspondence are the letters sent to him concerning the death penalty. There are over 500 leaves of “fragments” that await a scholar knowledgeable in Morice’s career to identify the portions; many pages are readily identified as belonging together.
Explore the Charles Morice papers and letters using the collection guide »

Converse family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Four generations of the Converse family owned and operated the Christian Observer, a religious newspaper founded by Amasa Converse in 1840. Over the next several decades, the paper became the “leading newspaper in the southern Presbyterian Church, with a circulation larger than all other Presbyterian papers combined” (Converse, p. 381). Amasa’s son, Francis Bartlett Converse, and grandsons, Harry P. Converse and Francis (Frank) Bartlett Converse, Jr. worked on or were affiliated with the newspaper. His great-granddaughter, Marys Converse, became the paper’s managing editor in 1960. The Converse Family papers contains correspondence, financial and legal records, bound volumes, photographs, printed matter and other materials that document the personal and professional lives of Amasa Converse, Francis Bartlett Converse, Harry P. Converse, and Marys Converse—the dynasty that published America’s oldest religious weekly, the Christian Observer, for more than 160 years. The collection is particularly rich in material documenting the operations of the Observer from its inception in the early 1800s to its closure in 1976.
Explore the Converse family papers using the collections guide »

Edward Drinker Cope papers, 1859-1907 (Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia): Edward Drinker Cope (1840-1897) was one of the most distinguished American scientists of the 19th century. The bulk of his work was in the fields of paleontology, zoology, geology and anatomy. During his lifetime, he discovered and described over 600 new species and contributed over 1300 papers to scientific literature. The collection contains certificates and honors, medals, manuscripts of scientific papers, drawings, scientific photographs, biographical material, news clippings, account books, and miscellaneous notes.
Explore the Edward Drinker Cope papers using the collections guide »

Edward James Nolan documents and correspondence on the History of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, 1846-1915 (Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia): Edward James Nolan (1846-1921) served as the librarian at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia from 1869 until his death. During his tenure as librarian, he performed research on and wrote the history of the Academy which was completed in 1909. This collection contains material collected by Nolan for his history, including transcriptions of early minutes, deeds, biographies, news clippings, letters and reminiscences of colleagues.
Explore the Edward James Nolan documents and correspondence using the collections guide »

A volume written by Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson

A volume written by Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson

Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson papers, 1752-1799 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson (1737-1801), considered to be the outstanding female poet of her place and time, was a leader in the literary world of colonial Pennsylvania and an avid writer, who composed poems, songs, travel accounts and other writings, referencing literature, natural history, religion, politics and current events. This collection consists of six volumes of writings which probably represent all of her work, most of which is unpublished. Researchers interested in Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson, women authors in colonial America and the early United States, or a female commentary on contemporary events will find this collection to be extremely valuable.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson papers using the collection guide »

Francis Whittier Pennell biographies of botanists, circa 1924-1952 (Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia): Francis Whittier Pennell (1886-1952) was an American botanist and a world authority on the Scrophulariaceae. He served as associate curator of the New York Botanical Garden from 1914 to 1921 and as curator of plants at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia from 1921 until his death. He had an intense interest in the history of botany and collected biographical material on many early botanists. This collection includes Pennell’s research notes as well as some finished biographies.
Explore the Francis Whittier Pennell biographies of botanists using the collection guide »

Integration, the Oakes Newsletter

Integration, the Oakes Newsletter

Helen Oakes papers (Temple University Urban Archives):  Helen Oakes was a nationally recognized activist for public education from the 1960s to the 1980s. Oakes was chairman of the West Philadelphia Schools Committee from 1965 to 1970, chairman of the Education Committee of the League of Women Voters in 1965, and in 1968, she wrote “The School District of Philadelphia: A Critical Analysis.” From 1971 to 1980, she was a member of the board of the Citizens Committee on Public Education in Philadelphia. She was a member of the Philadelphia Board of Education from 1982 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 she served as liaison in the educational partnership between ARCO Chemical Company and James Rhoads Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also wrote, published and distributed the “Oakes Newsletter,” from 1970 to 1989, which addressed issues affecting the Philadelphia School District. This collection contains the professional papers of Helen Oakes. The materials are for the years 1958 to 2002 and include correspondence; printed materials, such as newsletters and pamphlets; newspaper clippings; educational and statistical reports; meeting minutes; financial reports and memoranda. The materials relate to Helen Oakes’ long-term involvement with a wide-range of educational institutions and initiatives, specifically in Philadelphia. Of particular note, are significant materials related to Oakes’ research, writing and publication of the “Oakes Newsletter.”
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Helen Oakes papers using the collections guide »

Leary and Company (Leary’s Bookstore) archives, 1840s-1969 (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center): William A. Leary, was a small-time book seller in 1836 when he journeyed to Philadelphia to establish a sidewalk book stall on North Second Street. As business prospered, Leary moved to several different locations, finally settling at 138 North Second Street which was right next door to the Camel Tavern, a landmark in Philadelphia. Leary’s Book Store specialized in selling inexpensive, second—hand books. Because of its large inventory and cheap prices, Leary’s developed a national reputation. In addition to selling and buying books, Leary expanded his base of operations by venturing into the publishing business in the 1850s. William A. Leary, Jr. took over the book store in 1865. Stuart and Charles Mann purchased the store from the Leary Estate in 1876. Under the Stuart’s management, Leary’s became one of the largest old book dealers in the world. As more people moved to and shopped in the suburbs, Leary’s customer base declined. Leary’s went out of business on November 20, 1968. The Leary collection is divided into three series, Records, Bound Volumes/Ledgers, and Posters and Paintings. The over-all time frame of the collection spans from the 1840s to 1969.
Explore the Leary and Company records using the collections guide »

Lida Poynter's Manuscript

Lida Poynter's Manuscript

Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker, circa 1850-1946 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker consists of Poynter’s unpublished manuscript and research notes on the life of Dr. Mary E. Walker. Mary E. Walker (1832-1919) was a physician who served as a surgeon during the Civil War. She was awarded the Medal of Honor for her service and remains the only woman to have received the Medal. Throughout her life, she wrote, lectured and taught on medicine, dress reform, suffrage, and women’s rights, in general. In addition to Poynter’s manuscript and research notes, this collection features correspondence to and from Mary Walker, correspondence to and from Lida Poynter, and photographs of Mary Walker.
Explore the Lida Poynter collection using the collection guide »

Manuscript of

Manuscript of "Not on the Chart"

Logan family papers, 1640-1770, bulk 1767-1769 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Logan family was prominent in Philadelphia from the start of the province, serving the people in many capacities, including political, medical and literary. This is a collection of manuscripts obtained by the Library Company of Philadelphia that relates to the Logan family. The collection includes papers of the Logan family members Albanus Charles, Algernon Sydney, Deborah Norris, William Jr., and James as well as family materials collected by Frances A. Logan and William Logan Fox. The collection dates from 1684 to 1925 and consists of family papers, correspondence, diaries, writings, medical texts, lecture notes, financial records, poetry, visiting cards, and invitations.
Explore the Logan family papers using the collection guide »

Marianne Moore, poet

Marianne Moore, poet

Marianne Moore papers, 1850-1983 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): Marianne Craig Moore (1887-1972) was a noted American poet. Her first published work appeared in 1915. In 1921, her first book, Poems, was published in London by Hilda Doolittle and Winifred Ellerman (Bryher). In 1925, she became acting editor of The Dial, an influential American journal of literature and the arts. A disciplined craftsman, Moore won the admiration of fellow poets throughout her long career. The poet and critic T.S. Eliot called her one of the few producers of durable poetry in her time. The Marianne Moore Papers, 1850-1983, contains manuscripts, correspondence, financial records, albums, photographs, artwork, subject files, ephemera, awards and honors, and audio-visual material related to the life and work of poet Marianne Moore.
Explore the Marianne Moore papers using the collections guide »

To James Bond With Love

To James Bond With Love

Mary Wickham Bond papers on the “real” James Bond, 1907-1997 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The lives of James and Mary Bond, a Philadelphia ornithologist and author, respectively, were altered the day that author Ian Fleming, a bird lover who was familiar with Bond’s book, The Birds of the West Indies, appropriated James Bond’s name for his fictional spy character. The resulting confusion prompted Mary Wickham Bond to write How 007 Got His Name, in 1966, in which she tells the story of the real James Bond. This collection consists of Mary Wickham Bond’s collection of information regarding her husband, her own works on the writing, publishing and promoting of her books about her husband, and David Contosta’s writings about her husband.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Mary Wickham Bond papers on the “real” James Bond using the collection guide »

M’Carty and Davis records, 1773-circa 1888 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): Founded and owned by William McCarty (1788-1861) and Thomas Davis (1790?-1851), M’Carty & Davis was an early Philadelphia bookseller and publishing house. The M’Carty and Davis records, 1773-circa 1888 (bulk 1816-1851), primarily documents this business 1816 and 1850. Some records also document Moses Polock’s takeover of the company after 1850. The collection is particularly rich in business records that document the company’s inventory and orders, as well as in materials related to the company’s traveling sales force, which went door-to-door pedaling wares in western Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Virginia.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the M’Carty and Davis records using the collections guide »

Religious News Service records (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Louis Minsky founded Religious News Service in 1934 under the auspices of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. From the start, Religious News Service (RNS) was dedicated to providing authoritative and bias-free news about religion and ethics to both the secular and religious press. Its products included daily and domestic foreign news services, photographs, radio broadcast scripts, and features like “Week in Religion”, “Religious Remarkables” and “Inspirational Editorials”. The Religious News Service records, which dates from the 1930s to 1982, evidences the research and writing of RNS staff and includes news releases, photographic prints, photographic negatives, press clippings, articles and other materials produced and/or disseminated by the RNS. Materials in this collection substantially document the history of Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and Eastern Orthodox religion in the United States and around the world.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Religious News Service records using the collections guide »

A Catalogue of Rare Books of Six Centuries

A Catalogue of Rare Books of Six Centuries

Rosenbach Company records, 1900s-1965 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): The Rosenbach Company was a Philadelphia firm dealing in rare books and manuscripts, and fine and decorative arts. The company was established by Abraham Simon Wolf (A.S.W.) Rosenbach and his brother Philip H. Rosenbach in 1903. The company, with offices in Philadelphia and New York City, became recognized as one of the country’s preeminent dealers in rare books and literary manuscripts, and A.S.W. Rosenbach is credited with helping build the collections of Harry E. Widener, J.P. Morgan, Henry C. Folger, and Henry E. Huntington. among others. The Rosenbach Company records, 1900s-1965, contains minute books, financial records, catalogs, stock cards and inventories, clippings, scrapbooks, and other materials related to the operation of the Rosenbach Company. The collection is particularly rich in financial and business documents related to the company’s correspondence, sales, purchases, and inventories; some researchers will find value in the extensive collection of newspaper clippings, which provide insight into the celebrity of the Rosenbach brothers and their impact on mid-twentieth century American culture.
Explore the Rosenbach Company records using the collections guide »

Chapter 1

Chapter 1

Samuel George Morton papers, 1832-1862 (Library Company of Philadelphia):Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) of Philadelphia was a physician and natural scientist whose work focused on the craniometric studies of humans with conclusions regarding the relative intellectual capacities of the “five races.” His work had a profound influence on the development of physical anthropology in antebellum America. He also made contributions in the fields of geology, mineralogy, paleontology and natural history. Morton served as a professor of medicine at Pennsylvania College (now, the University of Pennsylvania.  This collection contains mainly the papers of Samuel George Morton, whose papers date from 1832 to 1851, when Morton devoted his research efforts almost exclusively to ethnology and to the collecting of human skulls for comparative studies. The bulk of the papers consist of incoming correspondence, from 1832 to 1851, relating to ethnology and other related interests such as anthropology, craniology, paleontology and Egyptology.  The remainder of the collection contains the papers of Samuel George Morton’s son, James St. Clair Morton, who served as an engineer during the Civil War.
Explore the Samuel George Morton papers and letters using the collection guide »

James Rush, author

James Rush, author

Rush family papers, 1748-1876 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Rush Family papers includes material from Benjamin Rush, physician, social activist, educator, writer and patriot; his brother Jacob Rush, lawyer, Supreme Court judge, and patriot; and Benjamin’s son James Rush, physician and Treasurer of the United States Mint. These American men were “strong characters, zealous patriots during the stirring period in which they lived, tenacious of their convictions and of the high standard of individual duty which they set for others, and typified in themselves,” (Richards, page 53). The bulk of the collection is the papers of Dr. Benjamin Rush and his son Dr. James Rush. Judge Jacob, John, Richard and William are represented, but to a much lesser degree. The other Rush family members are represented in a very limited manner. The collection contains correspondence; financial records; medical notes, lectures, and case histories; writings regarding medicine, politics, and the judicial system; and observations on colonial Philadelphia, the formation of the United States, and the new nation.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Rush family papers using the collection guide »

Leave a Comment