Women’s History

Alma A. Clarke

Alma A. Clarke

Alma A. Clarke papers, 1914-1946 (Bryn Mawr College):  Alma A. Clarke was an American who volunteered in World War I helping French orphans through the Committee France-America for the Protection of the Children of the Frontier and as a Red Cross Auxiliary Nurse in the American Red Cross Military Hospital No. 1 in Neuilly-sur-Seine. The Alma A. Clarke papers provide an in depth view into a World War I nurse’s memories and views on her service in France. For the most complete view of Clarke’s experiences in France, a researcher should first examine the “Scrapbooks.” Researchers interested in World War I, the American Red Cross, nursing in World War I, hospitals in World War I and children as victims of war will find this to be an extremely valuable resource. Not only does this collection reveal Clarke’s memories of the War through her collected material, photographs, and documents, it also reveals the way in which both the United States and France promoted their cause through patriotic materials as well as how the countryside and citizens of France were affected by World War I. This collection provides perspective on the War from the viewpoints of children orphaned by the war, nurses exposed to the long term effects of battle, and the soldiers who did not survive the war without physical wounds.
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American Women's Hospital Service

American Women's Hospital Service

American Women’s Hospital Service photographs, 1917-1982 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  The American Women’s Hospitals (AWH) developed from the War Service Committee of the Medical Women’s National Association (later called the American Medical Women’s Association) in 1917, to provide, register and finance American women physicians for war work; to offer medical and emergency relief to refugees; and, later, to provide international public health service. In 1959, AWH became an independent agency and remained such until 1982 when it re-merged with the American Medical Women’s Association. The collection houses photographs created by the American Women’s Hospitals Service (AWHS) from 1917 to 1982 to document and promote the organization’s efforts to provide health care to under-serviced populations in the United States and abroad. The photographs were frequently used in fundraising and publicity campaigns. As a result, many are annotated to identify the primary subject, geographic location and, occasionally, individuals, providing a graphic chronicle of the variety and forms of AWHS fieldwork worldwide. Researchers will find images of field and clinic work conducted in Africa, Albania, Bolivia, France, Greece, India, Korea, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, United States, Vietnam and Yugoslavia, to name a few. In addition, there are a few files at the end containing portraits of AWHS personnel and significant women in medicine that were also associated with the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. In addition to the photographic record, this collection also includes a few files of Dr. Esther Lovejoy correspondence and written material used by Dr. Alma Dea Morani to prepare for a lecture in 1974.
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Letters to Anne Hampton Brewster

Letters to Anne Hampton Brewster

Anne Hampton Brewster papers and letters, 1777-1892 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Anne Hampton Brewster (1818-1892) was an American novelist, journalist and foreign correspondent who defied contemporary conceptions of womanhood and society during the nineteenth century. The papers date from 1777 to 1892, with the majority of the materials dating from 1845 to 1892. The materials primarily consist of diaries, journals, commonplace books, correspondence, newspaper clippings, notes about her writings and drafts of her writings. The materials document Anne Hampton Brewster’s personal life with friends and family, and they document her professional life as a journalist and writer.
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Anne Werstner Wood slide collection, 1940-1983 (bulk 1940-1960) (Pennsylvania Horticultural Society):  Anne Wertsner Wood (1907-2004) was a horticulturist, writer and lecturer from the Philadelphia area. She was an active leader in the gardening community at the local, national, and international levels. She is recognized for her participation in numerous flower shows, garden creations, outreach activities, writings and lectures. This collection contains slides compiled and used by Anne Wertsner Wood. There are two boxes of color photographic slides that date from 1940 to 1983, with the bulk of slides dating from 1940 to 1960. The slides document Wertsner’s travels to various local and international gardens, her involvement with the Philadelphia Flower Show, and her involvement in community activities.
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Anny Elston

Anny Elston

Anny Elston papers, 1918-1976, bulk 1944-1972 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Anny Elston (1895-1975), a German born and trained pediatrician, immigrated to the United States in 1941 due to the “Racial Laws” in Nazi Germany. After obtaining her New York State Medical License in 1942, she began practicing medicine in New York City until retiring in 1972. The Anny Elston papers include information regarding Dr. Elston’s medical credentials and continuing education, her medical practice in New York City, and patient records.
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Women Today

Women Today

Belfield papers (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  The Belfield papers include materials from families who lived in the Belfield mansion in Germantown, Pennsylvania from 1826 until 1984; however, the papers span 1679 to 1977. Featured individuals include William and Sarah Logan Fisher Wister, their son John Wister and his wife Sarah Tyler Boas Wister, their granddaughter Sarah Logan Wister Starr and her husband James Starr, and their great-granddaughter S. Logan Starr Blain and her husband Dr. Daniel Blain. The collection also houses papers from related individuals in the Emlen, Fisher, Hall, Lindley, Logan, Meigs, Wister, and other families. This collection includes correspondence, financial records, ephemera, photographs, scrapbooks, pamphlets, periodicals, and other items. Topics that are particularly well documented in the Belfield papers include: Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; Colonial Dames of America; the Sesquicentennial Exposition; stamp collecting; world travel during the Great Depression; twentieth century psychiatry; nineteenth-century industry and legal practice; and the genealogy of the Logan, Fisher and Wister families.
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A Bibliography relating to Women in Medicine

A Bibliography relating to Women in Medicine

Bertha Van Hoosen papers, 1913-1971, bulk 1920-1950 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Bertha Van Hoosen (1863-1952), a doctor specializing in obstetrics and gynecology in Chicago, IL, founded the American Medical Women’s Association. Her collection includes correspondence, journal articles, plans for a Medical Women’s Library at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, teaching material, images, and bibliographic material regarding women in medicine. A large part of the collection concerns Van Hoosen’s interests in the National Medical Women’s Association, later the American Medical Women’s Association and the Medical Women’s Library. There are also photographic images, x-rays and illustrations of medical case studies conducted by Van Hoosen.
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Letters from Minnie Pickett Bowles regarding her Work

Letters from Minnie Pickett Bowles regarding her Work

Bowles family correspondence, 1922-1960 (Haverford College):  The Bowles family was deeply involved with Quaker missionary and relief work during the 20th century. In 1900, the Bowles moved to Japan under the auspices of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and managed the Friends School and established the Tokyo Friends Center. During World War II, the Bowles family moved to Hawaii and worked with war refugees. The Bowles family correspondence consists of correspondence from Gilbert and Minnie Pickett Bowles to their son Gordon Townsend Bowles from 1922 to 1932 and to Gordon Townsend and Jane T. Bowles from 1932 to 1960. This correspondence is essentially family correspondence, but also includes information regarding the Bowles’ Quaker relief work, their views on Quakerism and their day-to-day activities.
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Chicago Woman’s Medical College/Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School records, 1870-1924, 1947 (Drexel University College of Medicine): The Woman’s Hospital Medical College of Chicago was founded in 1870 by Mary H. Thompson (1829-1895) and Dr. William Heath Byford (1817-1890) in order to provide equal education opportunities for female medical students in the Chicago area. In 1879, the name of the medical school was changed to the Woman’s Medical College of Chicago; and in 1892, it was taken over by the Northwestern University and renamed the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School. Over the next ten years, financial difficulties arose and in 1902, the medical school was dismantled. The Woman’s Clinical Dispensary, “a working corps of clinical teachers and assistants” who held clinics, survived until 1907. This collection documents the Chicago Woman’s Medical College and its transitions to the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School from 1870 to 1945, with the bulk of the material created from 1870 to 1924. The collection consists of Alumnae Association material, alumnae biographies, correspondence, histories of the college, alumnae surveys, annual announcements, reports, minutes, and correspondence, as well as limited information on the Woman’s Clinical Dispensary.
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Conner family papers, 1816-1903, bulk: 1832-1856 (Independence Seaport Museum): Susan Dillwyn Physick was born on June 22, 1803, in Philadelphia, the second of four children. Her parents were Elizabeth Emlen, whose family was one of the wealthiest in Philadelphia, and Philip Syng Physick, the prominent physician. In 1824 she met naval Master-Commandant David Conner, and the two married on June 25, 1828. The Conner family papers consist primarily of 23 journals kept by Susan Dillwyn Physick Conner from 1832 to 1856. The collection also includes her unfinished autobiography with amendments by her son, a scrapbook, two notebooks, two journals by her son, one journal by Philip Conner’s wife, two letters (one by Mary Lewis, one by Philip Conner), three account books, two published books owned by Susan Physick Conner, and notes and drafts by Arthur Hale, Philip Conner’s son-in-law.
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"I first perceived a tumour"

"I first perceived a tumour"

Dillwyn and Emlen family correspondence, 1770-1818 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Dillwyn and Emlen family was joined in 1795 when Susanna Dillwyn married Samuel Emlen, Jr. Both the Dillwyn and Emlen families were prominent in early America as Quakers and advocates for abolition. This collection consists of five disbound volumes of letters written to and from William Dillwyn of London and his daughter Susanna Dillwyn in America from 1770 to 1795; and thereafter until 1818, to and from Susanna and her husband Samuel Emlen, Jr. of Burlington County, New Jersey. Although Susanna lived almost her entire life apart from her father, their letters are frequent and deal primarily with family matters and kin. However, there is frequent comment concerning such topics as yellow fever; abolitionism and slavery; Native Americans; breast cancer; and American and European politics, including the Napoleonic wars and the embargo, as well as their effects upon trade and merchants in Philadelphia and London.
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Talks by Dorothy M. Steere

Talks by Dorothy M. Steere

Douglas and Dorothy Steere collection, 1896-2003 (Haverford College):  Douglas and Dorothy Steere were prominent figures of the Quaker movement in the twentieth century, and deeply committed to the causes of peace and spiritual enrichment. This commitment is evident in their involvement with Quaker-led relief work after World War II, Quaker spiritual retreats, international diplomacy, and Dorothy’s work with the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Douglas taught philosophy at several institutions including Haverford College, and published extensively on topics in Quaker philosophy and history. This collection contains considerable material related to Douglas’s work as a writer, professor, and diplomat. Given his role as a distinguished figure within twentieth-century Quakerism, this material is also relevant to researchers interested in recent Quaker history as a whole. There is also some fascinating material produced and collected by Dorothy related to the Civil Rights movement, including a letter from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
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Elizabeth Gray Vining, 1897-1989 (Haverford College): Elizabeth Gray Vining (1902-1997) was an author of children’s books served as the tutor to the crown prince of Japan, Akihito, from 1946 to 1950. The collection consists of correspondence, materials regarding books authored by Vining, articles, lectures and addresses, photographs and information documenting her and her family’s lives.

Bookplate of Elizabeth Graeme

Bookplate of Elizabeth Graeme

Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson papers, 1752-1799 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson (1737-1801), considered to be the outstanding female poet of her place and time, was a leader in the literary world of colonial Pennsylvania and an avid writer, who composed poems, songs, travel accounts and other writings, referencing literature, natural history, religion, politics and current events. This collection consists of six volumes of writings which probably represent all of her work, most of which is unpublished. Researchers interested in Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson, women authors in colonial America and the early United States, or a female commentary on contemporary events will find this collection to be extremely valuable.
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Women in the Visual Arts

Women in the Visual Arts

FOCUS archives, 1972-1975 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives):  “FOCUS: Philadelphia Focuses on Women in the Visual Arts” was a city-wide arts program that occurred in April and May of 1974 and featured mostly East Coast artists and scholars. Initiated by Philadelphia painter Diane Burko, the two month program included art exhibitions, juried shows, panels, lectures, workshops, demonstrations and film viewings, all organized by Philadelphia-area women who were involved with the arts. The central event of the FOCUS program was “Women’s Work: American Art, 1974,” a contemporary art exhibit financed by and held in the Museum of the Philadelphia Civic Center. Other FOCUS events focused on topics such as race, history, and the realities of being a female artist.The records in the FOCUS collection date from 1972 to 1975 and include meeting minutes from various FOCUS committees, outreach and advertising documents, correspondence, and records of the grant application process. Despite the relatively brief existence of the initiative, the deliberate documentation of FOCUS programs by internal committees makes this collection an especially comprehensive representation of the group’s activities.
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List of Graduates

List of Graduates

George A. Hay collection of administrative files of the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1890-1970, bulk 1925-1965 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  From 1925 to 1970, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMC) underwent significant change, adapting to both survive and prosper in a transforming society. Administrative change was brought about and explored to spark institutional growth and/or to mollify financial stress. Among the more significant events in the College’s history was the 1930 move to new and larger facilities in East Falls, and an administrative reorganization in 1942. In the 1940s and 1960s, WMC also explored the financial and administrative benefits of merging with other institutions in the Philadelphia area; Kensington Women’s Hospital and the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Jefferson Medical College. Amidst all of the change, WMC continued to honor its traditions and celebrate milestones, especially its Centennial Anniversary in 1950. In 1970, the College made the decision to admit male students for the first time and change its name to the Medical College of Pennsylvania. The George A. Hay collection of administrative files is a assemblage of records created by various administrators of the Woman’s College of Medicine from 1925 to 1965. Creators of the records include: George A. Hay, comptroller; Sarah Logan Wister Starr, president of the Board of Corporators; Vida Hunt Francis, secretary; Dr. Ellen Culver Potter, a member of the faculty as well as acting president in the 1940s; and others. In addition, there is a small sampling of very early administrative records, that are dated 1796, and from 1861 to 1928. Those files include a deed to land in East Falls in Philadelphia, report cards, correspondence and other materials. Generally speaking, the records housed in this collection evidence the day to day administration of the college, especially relating to its finances; financial planning; fundraising; future needs of the college; and a few significant landmarks in institutional history, the 1942 administrative reorganization, the 1950 Centennial Celebration, and explored institutional mergers with Jefferson Medical College, Kensington Women’s Hospital and Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
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School-by-school analysis ...

School-by-school analysis ...

Helen Oakes papers (Temple University Urban Archives): Helen Oakes was a nationally recognized activist for public education from the 1960s to the 1980s. Oakes was chairman of the West Philadelphia Schools Committee from 1965 to 1970, chairman of the Education Committee of the League of Women Voters in 1965, and in 1968, she wrote “The School District of Philadelphia: A Critical Analysis.” From 1971 to 1980, she was a member of the board of the Citizens Committee on Public Education in Philadelphia. She was a member of the Philadelphia Board of Education from 1982 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 she served as liaison in the educational partnership between ARCO Chemical Company and James Rhoads Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also wrote, published and distributed the “Oakes Newsletter,” from 1970 to 1989, which addressed issues affecting the Philadelphia School District. This collection contains the professional papers of Helen Oakes. The materials are for the years 1958 to 2002 and include correspondence; printed materials, such as newsletters and pamphlets; newspaper clippings; educational and statistical reports; meeting minutes; financial reports and memoranda. The materials relate to Helen Oakes’ long-term involvement with a wide-range of educational institutions and initiatives, specifically in Philadelphia. Of particular note, are significant materials related to Oakes’ research, writing and publication of the “Oakes Newsletter.”
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Serving our Defenders

Serving our Defenders

Historical Society of Pennsylvania collection of World War II papers, 1938-1948 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  In late 1942, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania solicited materials to form an artificial collection to document the war effort of a number of community and social service agencies in Philadelphia. The bulk of the material donated came from the Office of War Information, the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, and the United Service Organization of Philadelphia. Smaller donations were made by other community organizations and volunteers such as Mrs. Weber, a member of St. Mark’s church who corresponded with servicemen. The collection, which dates from 1938 to 1948, consists of press releases, administrative records, correspondence, financial records, photographs, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, posters, and ephemera.
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Howard Haines Brinton and Anna Shipley Cox Brinton papers, 1859-2005 (Haverford College): Howard Haines Brinton and Anna Shipley Cox Brinton were 20th-century Quaker educators and prolific authors whose areas of expertise included the physical sciences and the Classics. Notably, they also worked for the American Friends Service Committee in Europe, for Friends Center in Tokyo, Japan, and as directors of Pendle Hill, an adult study center in Wallingford, PA. They were both recorded ministers in the Religious Society of Friends. This collection also contains materials of other Brinton, Bean, Cox and Shipley Family members.

Jean Scobie Davis

Jean Scobie Davis

Jean Scobie Davis papers, 1892-1985 (Bryn Mawr College):  Jean Scobie Davis, a 1914 graduate of Bryn Mawr College, taught economics and sociology at Agnes Scott College, Vassar College, Pierce College, Wells College and the American Women’s College in Beirut. A lifetime interest in prison reform resulted in her work at the New York State Correctional Facility in Bedford Hills, New York. The Jean Scobie Davis papers is a collection consisting largely of Jean Scobie Davis’ diaries and correspondence covering nearly all stages of her life. The collection, which dates from 1892 to 1985, is divided into seven subseries: “Autobiographical Material;” “Correspondence;” “Diaries;” “Family History;” “Photographs;” “Prison Reform;” and “Scrapbooks and Guestbook.” Material found in the collection is diverse, and consists of letters, reports, bound diaries as well as loose diary pages, photographs, scrapbooks, and handwritten notes.
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League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania records, 1867-1988 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania was established in 1920 as a successor organization to the Pennsylvania Woman Suffrage Association, with the purpose of providing “education to increase the effectiveness of women voters and to further better government.” The League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania records document the history of this organization from 1867 to 1980, however, the bulk of the material dates from 1959 to 1977. The majority of the materials consist of minutes, newsletters, reports and memorabilia; however, there is a small amount of early material, particularly relating to the suffrage movement. Of particular interest may be the photographs of the 1915 Women’s Liberty Bell Tour in support of the vote.

On television

On television

League of Women Voters of Philadelphia records, 1920-1984 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  The League of Women Voters (LWV) was established in 1919, to help educate women on the civil responsibilities of voting. In addition to its primary focus of educating the public during elections, the LWV quickly extended its program, taking positions on several national issues, especially the legal status of women; foreign policy, like the institution of the United Nations and the Marshall Plan; as well as the on-going debate over the taxation of margarine. Locally, chapters were involved in public issues such as child care, city management, housing, public education and public health. The Philadelphia chapter communicated with the national and state League organizations, politicians, civic leaders, and organizations. The League of Women Voters of Philadelphia records houses administrative documents and organizational papers for the Philadelphia branch of the League of Women Voters (LWV). The collection, which dates from 1920 to 1984, consists of materials from the national, state, and local branches of LWV. In particular, there are financial records, membership lists, publications, program materials, meeting minutes, correspondence and memoranda, newspaper clipping scrapbooks, and audiovisual materials. These records evidence the organization’s administration as well as its outreach activities, and document the development of an important women’s rights organization with a strong commitment to educating women on political issues and the importance of voting.
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Lennig family papers, 1803-1859 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): The Lennig family immigrated to the United States from their native France in 1813. Nicholas Lenning (d. 1835), with his wife Elise de Boulignez, settled in Philadelphia and started a business, Nicholas Lennig and Company. Over the years, the business’s name changed to Tacony Chemical Works and C & F Lennig, reflecting the involvement of Lennig’s son, Charles, and his nephew, Frederick Lennig. The Lennig family papers houses a small collection of correspondence and other records, dating from 1803 to 1859; the period of time just before and after the Lennigs left France for Germany and, eventually, Philadelphia. A majority of the papers in the collection are written in French, but researchers will also find some Latin and German.
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"The Forgotten Women"

"The Forgotten Women"

Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker, circa 1850-1946 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker consists of Poynter’s unpublished manuscript and research notes on the life of Dr. Mary E. Walker. Mary E. Walker (1832-1919) was a physician who served as a surgeon during the Civil War. She was awarded the Medal of Honor for her service and remains the only woman to have received the Medal. Throughout her life, she wrote, lectured and taught on medicine, dress reform, suffrage, and women’s rights, in general. In addition to Poynter’s manuscript and research notes, this collection features correspondence to and from Mary Walker, correspondence to and from Lida Poynter, and photographs of Mary Walker.
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Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Logan family was a prominent Philadelphia family dating back to 1699, when James Logan, the family patriarch, arrived in Philadelphia to serve as the first secretary of the Pennsylvania colony. Through work in agriculture and politics, Logan and his descendants were intimately involved in the development of the Pennsylvania colony and, later, the fledging United States. James Logan’s prominence resulted in connections, both professional and familial, with other prominent colonial families, including the Norris and Dickinson families. The Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (bulk 1670-1872), documents James Logan’s personal and professional life, as well as that of several generations of his descendents. There are papers documenting the lives of his son William, his grandson George Logan, his great-grandsons Albanus Charles Logan and Algernon Sydney Logan, and the subsequent relationships with the Dickinson and Norris families. John Dickinson, who married one of James Logan’s descendents, is well documented in this collection as are his activities with the Pennsylvania and Delaware governments and his legal practice. This collection is rich in the history of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Delaware, the formation of the colony of Pennsylvania, the relationship of early colonials with the Native Americans, the bid for independence and the later formation of the United States of America. Included in the papers are correspondence, legal records, estate records, financial records, land and property records, diaries, and writings. Not only are prominent political figures (James Logan, George Logan, and John Dickinson) well documented in this collection, but women are also well documented, largely thanks to Deborah Norris Logan who kept a diary for most of her adult life. Her diaries and letters and those of some of her female relations reveal a glimpse into the lives of educated and prominent women in the Philadelphia area during the 18th and 19th centuries.
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The First Women Physicians

The First Women Physicians

Longshore family papers, 1819-1902 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women’s education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence.
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Machteld Mellink

Machteld Mellink

Machteld Mellink papers, 1938-2006 (Bryn Mawr College):  Machteld Johanna Mellink, celebrated archaeologist and professor of archaeology at Bryn Mawr College from 1949 to 1988, was born in Amsterdam, Holland in 1917. She received her BA in 1938 and MA in 1941 from the University of Amsterdam, and her PhD from the University of Utrecht in 1943. The Machteld Mellink papers cover Professor Mellink’s academic and archaeological career from the late 1950s to the early 2000s. Included in the collection are her writings and notes, photographs, publications, and a few excavation tools. Researchers interested in her academic career, as well as her work related to excavation sites such as Kızılbel, Tarsus, and Sardis, will find valuable information in this collection. However, this collection does not provide particularly strong insight into archaeological history, nor Professor Mellink’s thought process when approaching archaeological issues. Instead, this collection is mostly comprised of lecture notes, manuscripts of writings, organizational material, and works sent to Mellink by colleagues in the field.
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(Please ask Presbyterian Historical Society for permission to use photographs)

(Please ask Presbyterian Historical Society for permission to use photographs)

Maggie Kuhn papers (Presbyterian Historical Society): Margaret E. (Maggie) Kuhn (1905-1995) was a lifelong American activist, most famous for founding the Gray Panthers, an advocacy organization for a wide range of social and political issues, especially senior citizens’ rights, in 1970. She started the organization at age sixty-five, after being forced into retirement by the United Presbyterian Church. The Gray Panthers became known for advocating nursing home reform and fighting “ageism,” claiming that “old people constitute America’s biggest untapped and undervalued human energy source.” She also dedicated her life to fighting for human rights, social and economic justice, global peace, integration and an understanding of mental health issues. The Maggie Kuhn papers, 1880 to 1989, consist of correspondence, administrative documents, printed matter, reports, books, photographs, and other materials documenting Kuhn’s personal life and professional work. The collection is particularly rich in materials related to Kuhn’s work with the Gray Panthers and the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America.
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Marianne Moore, poet

Marianne Moore, poet

Marianne Moore papers, 1850-1983 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): Marianne Craig Moore (1887-1972) was a noted American poet. Her first published work appeared in 1915. In 1921, her first book, Poems, was published in London by Hilda Doolittle and Winifred Ellerman (Bryher). In 1925, she became acting editor of The Dial, an influential American journal of literature and the arts. A disciplined craftsman, Moore won the admiration of fellow poets throughout her long career. The poet and critic T.S. Eliot called her one of the few producers of durable poetry in her time. The Marianne Moore Papers, 1850-1983, contains manuscripts, correspondence, financial records, albums, photographs, artwork, subject files, ephemera, awards and honors, and audio-visual material related to the life and work of poet Marianne Moore.
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Mary Wickham Bond with James Bond

Mary Wickham Bond with James Bond

Mary Wickham Bond papers on the “real” James Bond, 1907-1997 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The lives of James and Mary Bond, a Philadelphia ornithologist and author, respectively, were altered the day that author Ian Fleming, a bird lover who was familiar with Bond’s book, “The Birds of the West Indies,” appropriated James Bond’s name for his fictional spy character. The resulting confusion prompted Mary Wickham Bond to write “How 007 Got His Name,” in 1966, in which she tells the story of the real James Bond. This collection consists of Mary Wickham Bond’s collection of information regarding her husband, her own works on the writing, publishing and promoting of her books about her husband, and David Contosta’s writings about her husband.
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Miller-Dickey family papers, 1786-1992 (Chester County Historical Society):  This collection consists of papers of the Cross, Dickey, and Miller families of Chester County, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Maryland. John Miller and his wife, Margaret, emigrated from Scotland to Pennsylvania with their young daughter, Jane, in 1786. Miller, who was trained as a stone cutter in Scotland, developed a thriving marble business in Philadelphia; he also owned a farm in Great Valley, Pennsylvania. John was active in the Philadelphia community; he was an early member of the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society, and a supporter of the Magdalene and Missionary Societies. The papers in this collection consist primarily of personal correspondence, business records, genealogical notes, diaries, and family photographs, of the Cross, Dickey and Miller families. The collection is particularly strong on relationships between women, family health, Presbyterian church, the history of Oxford, Pennsylvania, marble cutting business, and the genealogy of the Miller, Dickey, and Cross families.
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Olivia Stokes Hatch

Lady of the Stokes or Hatch family

Olivia Stokes Hatch papers, 1859-1993 (Bryn Mawr College):  The Olivia Stokes Hatch papers reveal the relief work of women during the early 20th century, as well as family relationships, largely illustrated through extensive family correspondence. Olivia Stokes Hatch (1908-1983) was born in New Haven, CT and attended Bryn Mawr College from 1925 to 1930. Prior to her marriage she was very active with the American Red Cross and American Conferences of Social Work. In 1939, Olivia Phelps Stokes married John Davis Hatch, Jr. an art collector, consultant, and museum director. They had four children: John Davis Hatch III, Daniel Lindley Hatch, James Stokes Hatch, and Sarah Stokes Hatch. Anna V.S. Mitchell, the sister of Caroline Mitchell Phelps Stokes, and the aunt of Olivia Stokes Hatch, spent most of her life engaged in relief work. Her career began in 1915 in Serbia and ended in 1936 in Constantinople. The Olivia Stokes Hatch papers, 1859 to 1993, is a collection that consists largely of correspondence between the Phelps, Stokes, Mitchell, and Hatch families. The collection also includes photographs, essays, diaries, and other printed material.
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Philadelphia General Hospital Training School for Nurses duty registers, 1885-1911 (College of Physicians): In September 1883, the Board of Guardians of Philadelphia General Hospital decided to establish a training school for nurses. At first, the program could be completed in one year; eventually, the program was expanded to include three years of course work. By 1931, the school had certified almost 2,000 nurses. This collection of duty registers of the Training School for Nurses of the Philadelphia General Hospital consists of fifteen bound volumes dating from 1885 to 1911. The volumes contain information about the daily staffing of nurses in the different wards of the Philadelphia General Hospital. These records provide insight into the management of the hospital and the lives of the nurses who worked there.
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Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women

Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women

Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women records, 1916-1984 (Bryn Mawr College):  The Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women (PCAW) was founded in 1916 by sixteen women advertising executives. The Club participated in charitable efforts, offered advertising courses, published a newsletter (Ad-Land News), and hosted social events throughout its history. These efforts garnered national recognition for PCAW as a leading advertising organization. It also won them recognition locally as an organization committed to helping the community through scholarships and charitable giving. This collection contains the records produced by PCAW from 1916 to 1984, including material related to their advertising courses, events, history, charity involvement, and meetings. The collection has several strengths, the most notable of which is its comprehensive coverage of organizational activities from 1930 to 1977. Other strengths include the number of Ad-Land News publications within the collection, as well as the event invitations, most of which exhibit graphics and fonts reflecting contemporary advertising styles. Also of note are the records of PCAW’s heavy involvement in local affairs (advertising courses, charitable efforts, etc.), which demonstrates its influence in the area.
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Reinhardt, Hawley and Hewes family

Reinhardt, Hawley and Hewes family

Reinhardt, Hawley and Hewes family papers, 1762-1955 (Haverford College): The Reinhardt, Hawley, Hewes and Meredith families are tied together through marriage and their Quaker faith across multiple generations. William Dell Reinhardt, a University of Pennsylvania graduate and doctor, married Rebecca Hawley, a teacher. They had six children: Jesse Hawley Reinhardt, Mary Bailey Reinhardt, Esther Meredith Reinhardt, Lydia Ludwig Reinhardt, Elizabeth Christina Reinhardt, and David Jones Reinhardt. David Jones Reinhardt married Anna Margaret Hewes in 1896. These individuals created the bulk of the material contained within this collection. This collection consists of correspondence; account books; certificates; diaries and household information lists; friendship books; land and insurance records; marriage certificates; miscellaneous family records; wills and estates; genealogical research; photographs; Quaker tracts and poetry; newspaper clippings; and Acts of the Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania. Before looking into the collection, a researcher should take advantage of the book, The Reinhardts and Hawleys of Chester County, PA: Lives and Letters, Also Including Related Families of Meredith, Mendenhall, Pugh, Etc. and the Hewes of Salem County, NJ, by Ann M. P. McCormack, which includes duplicated copies of much of this collection with family interpretation. Most of the letters have been transcribed which is extremely helpful as the handwriting of the Reinhardts, Hawleys, Hewes, Mendenhalls and Merediths is frequently difficult to read. This collection will be of great interest to researchers interested in Quaker families, specifically in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The collection includes a wealth of documentation of family life for over a hundred years from the late 1700s to the early 1900s.
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Hilles family

Hilles family

Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers 1791-1930, bulk 1840-1882 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers house the correspondence of a Quaker family who lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Woodbury, New Jersey; Wilmington, Delaware; and other surrounding areas from approximately 1840 to 1882. A majority of the letters were written to or by Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles; her husband, John Smith Hilles; and other Tatum or Hilles family members. There is a small sampling of assorted family papers, dating from 1825 to 1901. Included, among other items, are school report cards of William Samuel Hilles from Haverford College and an 1834 memoir of Anne Cooper Tatum, Sarah Hilles’ mother. In addition, there are deeds to properties owned by the Hilles family in Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois and Pennsylvania from 1791 to 1886.
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Anne Rhoads

Anne Rhoads

Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers, 1824-1963, bulk 1824-1930 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers indicate strong relationships and family ties that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries. Sarah Wistar Rhoads (1839-1920) married William Gibbons Rhoads (1838-1880) on November 28, 1866. At that time, the Rhoads, Gibbons and Wistar families began corresponding, the result being an outstanding collection illustrating family support, friendship and love. These papers include correspondence, financial records, diaries and journals, memorabilia, classwork and notes, copied poems, prayers, sermons and verses, memorials, genealogical research, Quaker material and photographs. Researchers interested in family papers and Quaker family dynamics, social life, and customs may find this collection extremely useful.
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South Street Dance Company

South Street Dance Company

South Street Dance Company records, 1969-1991 (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Resource Center): The South Street Dance Company was founded by Ellen Forman and Alice Forner in 1974, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Company choreographed and performed original dance works, and hosted community programs for students and the elderly. The South Street Dance Company records houses audiovisual materials, photographs, administrative records, playbills, flyers, posters, newspaper clippings, financial records, correspondence, costumes and props dating from 1969 to 1991. This collection documents the performances and some daily operations of the Company and its founder, Ellen Forman. There is relatively little textual material in this collection; the bulk is made up of videotapes, audiotapes and photographs of performances and programs, and objects used during performances.
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Stella Kramrisch

Stella Kramrisch

Stella Kramrisch papers, 1921-1998 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives):  As a teacher, lecturer, curator and prolific writer, Dr. Stella Kramrisch (1898-1993) devoted nearly 70 years to the study and appreciation of Indian art. She served as the curator of Indian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 1954 until her death in 1993. The Stella Kramrisch papers document her activities, correspondence and publications. The records in this collection date from 1921 to 1998 and contain information about the art objects in Stella Kramrisch’s personal collection (which were later donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art), her publications and research, and a large series of photographs of Indian architecture, paintings and sculpture. The majority of the collection is print material related to Kramrisch’s research and scholarship. The breadth of the materials in the collection attests to Kramrisch’s seminal influence on and ground-breaking contributions to Indian art scholarship.
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Taylor Women

Taylor Women

Taylor and Nicholson family papers, 1810-1999, bulk 1869-1944 (Haverford College):  The Taylor and Nicholson family papers contain the records of these two families from the late-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. The two focal points of this collection are William Nicholson Taylor (1882-1945), and his mother, Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor (1857-1944). William graduated from Harvard in 1903 and afterwards spent considerable time abroad studying architecture. He also served as an officer in the United States Military from 1916 to 1917, and worked in diplomacy after the war. Rebecca was a noted writer and poet during this time period. The strength of this collection is the collected materials related to William’s time in the military, as well as his sketchbooks related to architecture and Harvard. Researchers interested in the works of Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor or Quaker women, should also consult Rebecca’s notebook and correspondence. There is extensive correspondence between the various members of these two families from the 1880s to 1940s.
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Jane Addams by Violet Oakley

Jane Addams by Violet Oakley

Thornton Oakley collection on Howard Pyle and his students, 1841-1992, bulk 1887-1951 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students covers the influential artistic career of Howard Pyle and several of his students, most notably Maxfield Parrish, Violet Oakley, and N.C. Wyeth. The collection includes a wide range of materials, which was collected and assembled by Pyle’s former student Thornton Oakley. There are tear sheets of artwork published in magazines, original illustrations, photographs, research notes, manuscripts, and correspondence. Besides Howard Pyle, artists well represented in this collection include Elizabeth Shippen Green, Jessie Wilcox Smith, George Harding, Violet Oakley, N.C. Wyeth, and a large collection of material on Maxfield Parrish. There is also a series dedicated to the children’s author and art historian, Henry Clarence Pitz, who researched and wrote The Brandywine Tradition about Pyle and his artistic influence. The collection’s primary strength is the collection of artwork by Pyle and his students, some of which is original. Oakley also compiled clippings and tear sheets of many of Pyle’s students, and organized them according to the artist’s name. This group of material would be valuable to researchers interested in tracing the careers of these artists.
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Report by Mary Vaux Walcott

Report by Mary Vaux Walcott

Vaux family papers, 1708-1995, bulk 1912-1932 (Haverford College):  The Vaux family was deeply involved with Quaker and Native American affairs throughout much of the nineteenth and early 20th centuries. George Vaux, Sr. was involved in Quaker activity through the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and other Quaker meetings throughout the world (including Antigua and London). Both George Vaux, Jr. and his sister Mary Morris Vaux Walcott served as commissioners for the U.S. Board of Indian Commissioners. This organization was established by the United States Congress in 1869 to watch over federal policies regarding Native Americans and to make certain that treaty obligations were fulfilled, especially in reference to supply deliveries. George Vaux, III also worked as the treasurer of the Indian Committee of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Within the collection are letters, reports, photographs, land surveys, and administrative records. This collection may be of special interest to researchers who are studying both the history and recent state of affairs of Native Americans in the United States. Of note in the collection are original Department of Interior documents, first-hand written accounts, and letters. Also, of great note are the land surveys, which provide valuable information from the early 1920s regarding the health, education, population, and land ownership of Native Americans, as well as maps, and photographs.
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West Philadelphia Hospital for Women records, 1899-1932 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): Founded by Dr. Elizabeth Comly-Howell in 1889, the West Philadelphia Hospital for Women was established in order to provide a place in West Philadelphia where women could be treated by women. In 1929, the hospital merged with the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia. At the time of the merger, it was arranged that all maternity cases would be sent to the West Philadelphia Hospital, and surgical cases would be kept at the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia continued in existence until 1964 when it was absorbed by the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The collection contains Board of Manager records, Executive Committee records and historical materials.
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William W. Cadbury and Catherine J. Cadbury collection, 1893-1970 (Haverford College): William Warder Cadbury was born on 1877 Oct 15 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joel and Anna Kaighn Cadbury and he was a birthright member of the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Western District (now called the Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting). In 1911 he married Sarah. I. Manatt; she died shortly after in 1912. Then, in 1917 he married Catherine Balderston Jones and had three daughters, Jane B. Cadbury, Emma Cadbury, and Catherine C. Cadbury. From 1909 to 1941 they worked as medical missionaries in China. Their correspondence and diaries detail much of the unrest and tumultuous events that took place in China during this time. The correspondence specifically mentions Sun Yat Sen and Cheng Kai Shek as well as the general feelings of the Chinese people.

Woman's Club of Germantown

Woman's Club of Germantown

Woman’s Club of Germantown records, 1917-1982 (Bryn Mawr College):  The Woman’s Club of Germantown records document the efforts of clubwomen to engage in community and civic life in Germantown, Pennsylvania from 1917 to 1982. The collection is not complete; however, researchers will find a fair sampling of documentation, evidencing Club administration and work for most years of its existence. The collection houses meeting minutes; committee, financial and other administrative records; scrapbooks and photograph albums; and records of the Woman’s Club of Germantown Juniors.
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