The Arts: Fine Arts, Music, and Performing Arts

Fine Arts

Community Programs and Urban Outreach records, 1951-1984 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives): The Department of Urban Outreach (DUO) of the Philadelphia Museum of Art was established in 1970 as an effort to reach new audiences by bringing art and art programs directly into Philadelphia’s inner city neighborhoods. In 1977, it became the Department of Community Programs, hereafter referred to as the Department. This collection documents the activities of the Department. The records date from 1951 to 1984, the bulk dating from 1970 to 1980, and include correspondence, exhibit planning documentation, photographs and scrapbooks, information concerning artists involved in various projects, and some general research files concerning related events and initiatives in the art community. While the collection does not provide comprehensive documentation of all aspects of the Department, it does include a wide variety of resources that demonstrate the Department’s intentions of appealing to culturally, economically and ethnically diverse communities. Of particular interest are the numerous records documenting exhibits and outreach programs, such as the Environmental Art and “Wall Art” programs.
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David J. Kennedy watercolors collection, 1840-1971 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  David J. Kennedy (1816-1898) was a passenger and freight agent for the Reading Railroad who painted as a hobby. Kennedy was born on the west coast of Scotland, in Port Mullin. The family immigrated to Canada in 1833, and three years later Kennedy traveled to Philadelphia to stay with his married sister. During his time there he painted various scenes of the city, including the homes of prominent residents of the city, as well as ordinary street views. Many of the buildings he illustrated no longer exist. He also painted several railroad scenes, during his tenure with the Reading Railroad. When Philadelphia hosted the 1876 Centennial Exhibition, Kennedy captured many of the buildings in his watercolors. This collection of Kennedy’s watercolors offer a multitude of views of Philadelphia as it appeared between 1840 and 1890. It consists of forty boxes, two folders of indices/inventories, eight volumes and one over-sized folio.

Focusing on Women in the Arts

Focusing on Women in the Arts

FOCUS archives, 1972-1975 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives):  “FOCUS: Philadelphia Focuses on Women in the Visual Arts” was a city-wide arts program that occurred in April and May of 1974 and featured mostly East Coast artists and scholars. Initiated by Philadelphia painter Diane Burko, the two month program included art exhibitions, juried shows, panels, lectures, workshops, demonstrations and film viewings, all organized by Philadelphia-area women who were involved with the arts. The central event of the FOCUS program was “Women’s Work: American Art, 1974,” a contemporary art exhibit financed by and held in the Museum of the Philadelphia Civic Center. Other FOCUS events focused on topics such as race, history, and the realities of being a female artist.The records in the FOCUS collection date from 1972 to 1975 and include meeting minutes from various FOCUS committees, outreach and advertising documents, correspondence, and records of the grant application process. Despite the relatively brief existence of the initiative, the deliberate documentation of FOCUS programs by internal committees makes this collection an especially comprehensive representation of the group’s activities.
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Sketches in the Julien Levy Gallery records

Sketches in the Julien Levy Gallery records

Julien Levy Gallery records, 1857-1982 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives): Julien Levy (1906-1981) was a pioneering New York art dealer of the 1930s and 1940s. He was introduced to the art world in Paris by Marcel Duchamp, who he met in New York in 1926. In Paris he met photographers and artists, including Man Ray, Berenice Abbot, and his future wife Joella Haweis, daughter of Dadaist muse Mina Loy. Upon his return to the United States, Levy worked briefly at the Weyhe Gallery before opening the Julien Levy Gallery at 602 Madison Avenue. In 1932, Levy mounted “Surrealisme,” an exhibition that introduced the Surrealist art movement to New York. This collection documents the career of prominent art gallery owner Julien Levy. The records date from 1857 to 1983 and include correspondence, exhibit announcements and invitations, scrapbooks, gallery financial ledgers, audio-visual materials, and personal papers such as letters, diaries, appointment books and calendars. The material in this collection reflects the course of Levy’s life, beginning with childhood letters and elementary school papers, and ending with Levy’s obituary and memorials. The records follow Levy, fresh from Paris, as he opens his gallery in New York and quickly becomes one of the most well-known and respected art dealers in the United States. This star-studded collection features correspondence with some of the most celebrated artists of the Surrealist and other art movements, including Salvador Dali, Arshile Gorky, Frida Kahlo, Man Ray, and Marcel Duchamp. The bulk of material dates from 1933 to 1949, and the 1970s. Researchers should note that the collection contains few records from the 1950s and early 1960s.
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Samuel R. Joyner artwork collection, 1947-2005 (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Resource Center):  Samuel R. Joyner is among the small number of African American cartoonists in the United States. Born in Philadelphia in 1924, he received early attention and publication credits. Joyner enlisted in the United States Navy after graduating from high school during World War II. Upon his return to the United States, he enrolled into the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now University of the Arts). His experience with racism and discrimination, primarily in the Navy, served as the backdrop for the kind of artwork he desired to produce. Over the years he would become a recognized “visual voice” for African Americans as represented in mass-circulated magazines and newspapers. His work has been published in over 40 different publications. The Samuel Joyner collection includes photographs, original art work and sketches (and photocopies), posters, signs, newspapers and clippings, newsletters, one book of African American illustrations, and ephemera. This collection spans 60 years, from 1947 to 2005. The majority of the material is dated in the 1990s.
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Indian art

Indian art

Stella Kramrisch papers, 1921-1998 (Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives):  As a teacher, lecturer, curator and prolific writer, Dr. Stella Kramrisch (1898-1993) devoted nearly 70 years to the study and appreciation of Indian art. She served as the curator of Indian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 1954 until her death in 1993. The Stella Kramrisch papers document her activities, correspondence and publications. The records in this collection date from 1921 to 1998 and contain information about the art objects in Stella Kramrisch’s personal collection (which were later donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art), her publications and research, and a large series of photographs of Indian architecture, paintings and sculpture. The majority of the collection is print material related to Kramrisch’s research and scholarship. The breadth of the materials in the collection attests to Kramrisch’s seminal influence on and ground-breaking contributions to Indian art scholarship.
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Sketches from Paris

Sketches from Paris

Taylor and Nicholson family papers, 1810-1999, bulk 1869-1944 (Haverford College):  The Taylor and Nicholson family papers contain the records of these two families from the late-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. The two focal points of this collection are William Nicholson Taylor (1882-1945), and his mother, Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor (1857-1944). William graduated from Harvard in 1903 and afterwards spent considerable time abroad studying architecture. He also served as an officer in the United States Military from 1916 to 1917, and worked in diplomacy after the war. Rebecca was a noted writer and poet during this time period. The strength of this collection is the collected materials related to William’s time in the military, as well as his sketchbooks related to architecture and Harvard. Researchers interested in the works of Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor or Quaker women, should also consult Rebecca’s notebook and correspondence. There is extensive correspondence between the various members of these two families from the 1880s to 1940s.
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Tearsheets of Illustrations

Tearsheets of Illustrations

Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students, 1883-1992 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students covers the influential artistic career of Howard Pyle and several of his students, most notably Maxfield Parrish, Violet Oakley, and N.C. Wyeth. The collection includes a wide range of materials, which was collected and assembled by Pyle’s former student Thornton Oakley. There are tear sheets of artwork published in magazines, original illustrations, photographs, research notes, manuscripts, and correspondence. Besides Howard Pyle, artists well represented in this collection include Elizabeth Shippen Green, Jessie Wilcox Smith, George Harding, Violet Oakley, N.C. Wyeth, and a large collection of material on Maxfield Parrish. There is also a series dedicated to the children’s author and art historian, Henry Clarence Pitz, who researched and wrote The Brandywine Tradition about Pyle and his artistic influence. The collection’s primary strength is the collection of artwork by Pyle and his students, some of which is original. Oakley also compiled clippings and tear sheets of many of Pyle’s students, and organized them according to the artist’s name. This group of material would be valuable to researchers interested in tracing the careers of these artists.
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Music

From one of Davison's scores

From one of Davison's scores

John Davison papers, 1938-1999 (Haverford College):  John Davison was a prolific composer who taught music at Haverford College from 1959 until his death in 1999. Several of his compositions were performed and recorded by orchestras throughout the United States. Within this collection are drafts of almost all his 144 scores, as well as audio recordings of a couple dozen of his pieces. Thus any researcher interested in his work should start here. Also of note to alumni are the scores Davison saved from his students.
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Keck with Trombone

Keck with Trombone

Marvin Rosefield Keck papers, 1916-1972, Bulk: 1916-1920 (Independence Seaport Museum):  Marvin Rosefield Keck, (1895-1971) was a musician who served in World War I in Admiral Niblack’s Flagship Band of the Mediterranean Fleet on the Flagship Olympia. The Marvin Rosefield Keck papers, which date from 1916 to 1972, consists of newspaper clippings, correspondence, diaries, drawings, photographs, scrapbooks, and unpublished writings. The collection covers Keck’s experience in World War I as a band member in the United States Navy aboard the U.S.S. Olympia and his experience in the American Legion band in South Dakota after World War I.
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Performing Arts

From one of the collection's scrapbooks

From one of the collection's scrapbooks

19th Century playbills, 1803-1902 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The 19th Century playbills collection contains a range of material related to theater culture in nineteenth century Philadelphia and in selected other theaters across the northeastern United States. Researchers will find nineteenth century playbills from the following Philadelphia theaters: the Walnut Street Theatre, the Academy of Music, the Arch Street Theatre, the Chestnut Street Theatre, National Theatre (Walnut Street), the National Theatre (Chestnut Street), the Melodeon, and the Continental Theatre. There are also playbills from the Chestnut Street, Arch Street, and 11th Street opera houses. This collection contains an assortment of scrapbooks which include newspaper clippings, photographs, and reviews of actors and performances. The majority of scrapbooks were assembled by various theater enthusiasts; however ten were compiled by theater producer and director Paul E. Glase, who was active in the Philadelphia theater scene during the early twentieth century. Because the collection covers an extensive period of time, it would be extremely valuable to researchers interested in the history and evolution of theater in Philadelphia, especially the latter half of the nineteenth century. The scrapbooks also have considerable research value, as many include newspaper clippings and photographs of famous actors and actresses of the nineteenth century whose careers may not otherwise be extensively documented.
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The Importance of Being Earnest

The Importance of Being Earnest

Delaware Theatre Company records, 1979-2000 (University of  Delaware):  The Delaware Theatre Company (DTC) is the largest professional theater in Delaware. Since its inception in 1978, DTC has served the cultural, educational, and artistic needs of the Wilmington community. Under the guidance of co-founder Cleveland Morris, who served as Artistic Director from 1978-1998, the Delaware Theatre Company developed into a community service organization that currently boasts numerous education and youth outreach programs, in addition to producing a number of plays each season. The Delaware Theatre Company records provide a behind-the-scenes look at the operation of a regional professional theater company. The papers include administrative materials, such as the meeting minutes, agendas, and correspondence from DTC’s Board members and committees. Financial documentation such as annual budgets and donations are also represented, as well as resources for grants and fundraising information. There is a significant amount of material relating to DTC’s development and outreach efforts; this includes marketing and publicity materials, press and news clippings, and community outreach projects. A bulk of the collection is made up of material relating to play production, including production files, director’s notes, playbills, actor’s information, and season planning. Cleveland Morris’ professional papers are also included in this collection.
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Davison's Music on Record

Davison's Music on Record

John Davison papers, 1938-1999 (Haverford College):  John Davison was a prolific composer who taught music at Haverford College from 1959 until his death in 1999. Several of his compositions were performed and recorded by orchestras throughout the United States. Within this collection are drafts of almost all his 144 scores, as well as audio recordings of a couple dozen of his pieces. Thus any researcher interested in his work should start here. Also of note to alumni are the scores Davison saved from his students.
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Cast of one of Lubin's films

Cast of one of Lubin's films

Lubin Film Company records, 1884-1984 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  Siegmund Lubin (1851-1923) founded the Lubin Manufacturing Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which, from 1895 to just before its collapse in 1916, grew to be one of the largest motion picture production companies in the world. His moviemaking empire started with the purchase of one film projector in 1895. Before long, it included a chain of movie theaters, multiple state-of-the-art production studios across the United States, hundreds of employees, numerous patents for recording and projecting equipment, and international movie distribution. Lubin’s logo and motto, “Clear As A Bell,” referred to the superior quality of his motion picture images. The Lubin Manufacturing Company records, 1881-2006, contains photographs, advertisements, business records, publicity materials, and artifacts documenting Siegmund Lubin’s short-lived career as one of America’s most successful film producers during the silent film era. While the collection does not include any full-length Lubin films, it is the largest collection of Lubin textual material in the world. There are seven series in the collection: “Scrapbooks,” “Printed Materials,” “Writings on Siegmund Lubin and his family,” “Corporate Information records,” “Lubin Collections at Free Library of Philadelphia,” and “Artifacts.”
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Scrapbook of Service

Scrapbook of Service

Marvin Rosefield Keck papers, 1916-1972, Bulk: 1916-1920 (Independence Seaport Museum):  Marvin Rosefield Keck, (1895-1971) was a musician who served in World War I in Admiral Niblack’s Flagship Band of the Mediterranean Fleet on the Flagship Olympia. The Marvin Rosefield Keck papers, which date from 1916 to 1972, consists of newspaper clippings, correspondence, diaries, drawings, photographs, scrapbooks, and unpublished writings. The collection covers Keck’s experience in World War I as a band member in the United States Navy aboard the U.S.S. Olympia and his experience in the American Legion band in South Dakota after World War I.
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Rehearsal with the Pennsylvania Ballet

Rehearsal with the Pennsylvania Ballet

Pennsylvania Ballet records (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Resource Center):  In 1962, Barbara Weisberger, a protégé of George Balanchine, started the School of the Pennsylvania Ballet to train dancers for her forthcoming dance company. The “Philadelphia Ballet,” later known as the Pennsylvania Ballet, was officially founded the following year. George Balanchine served as artistic advisor and the Ford Foundation provided the funds to help the struggling company establish itself. Based in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Ballet is still operational as of 2011, although it has undergone many changes in artistic direction and administration. The Pennsylvania Ballet records document the activities of the Pennsylvania Ballet Company, active from 1963 through 2011. The materials in this collection cover the years 1963 to 2004, with the bulk of materials dating from 1969 to 1990. This is still an active organization, so these records do not offer a complete picture of the company’s history and activities, as most records are active and retained by the Pennsylvania Ballet. While there is some administrative material, most of the collection is comprised of visual and graphic material: photographs and negatives, slides, posters and program art. This collection may be particularly useful to researchers interested in set, lighting, and costume design; choreography; and marketing and publicity.
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South Street Dance Company

South Street Dance Company

South Street Dance Company records, 1969-1991 (Temple University Libraries Special Collections Resource Center): The South Street Dance Company was founded by Ellen Forman and Alice Forner in 1974, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Company choreographed and performed original dance works, and hosted community programs for students and the elderly. The South Street Dance Company records houses audiovisual materials, photographs, administrative records, playbills, flyers, posters, newspaper clippings, financial records, correspondence, costumes and props dating from 1969 to 1991. This collection documents the performances and some daily operations of the Company and its founder, Ellen Forman. There is relatively little textual material in this collection; the bulk is made up of videotapes, audiotapes and photographs of performances and programs, and objects used during performances.
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