Religion

Baptist

Second Baptist Church and Congregation, 1803-1972 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Second Baptist Church of Philadelphia was established on February 14, 1803, when the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia presented ten men and ten women a public letter giving approbation to their request to start an independent church. It was first located on New Market Street then moved to a new building in 1875 on Seventh Street below Girard Avenue. The records for the Second Baptist Church of Philadelphia covers the entire time the church was in operation, from its founding in 1803 to 1972. The records themselves cover all the operational aspects of the church and the Sunday school programs. There is also a small amount of genealogical material covering from 1803 to 1968.

Lutheran

Muhlenberg's Journal

Muhlenberg's Journal

Ministerium of Pennsylvania records, 1657-1980 (Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia):  The Ministerium of Pennsylvania and Adjacent States (MOP) was founded in 1748, as the Ministerium of North America. Established under the guidance of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, it was the first centralized governing body of the Lutheran church formed in North America. Through MOP, a common liturgy was established as well as a means of educating American clergy. It also helped in forming numerous institutions and services in the Pennsylvania area, including The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia in 1864. MOP remained an important governing body until the 400th anniversary of the Reformation in 1918, when it was absorbed by the newly formed United Lutheran Church in America, consisting of the Lutheran Church bodies in Eastern America, the General Synod, the United Synod of the South and the General Council (of which the Ministerium of Pennsylvania was a member church). Then, in 1962, the United Lutheran Church in America joined with the American Evangelical Lutheran Church, the Augustana Lutheran Church, and the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church in America to form the Lutheran Church in America (LCA). The Ministerium of Pennsylvania records houses roughly 551 linear feet of records created by or pertaining to the activities and governance of the Evangelical Lutheran Church’s Ministerium of Pennsylvania and the Adjacent States (MOP), as well as that of individual churches and/or people affiliated with that governing body. The collection dates from 1657 to 2002; however the bulk of the papers fall between the years 1748 and 1980. The records include an assortment of meeting minutes; papers and printed materials regarding general administration of the Ministerium; papers and printed materials regarding the administration of particular churches and their histories; personal papers and biographical information for pastors and other individuals affiliated with the Lutheran Church or specific parishes; and baptism, marriage and death records; among others. Much of the collection is in English, but researchers should be aware that a significant amount of the records are in German.
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SEPA records

SEPA records

Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod archives, 1930-1978 (Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia):  The Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod (SEPA) of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America was established in 1968 as a collaborative partnership of congregations, institutions, rostered leaders and lay leaders in the territory of Southeastern Pennsylvania. According to its mission, SEPA “…oversee[s] the life and ministry of this church in this territory so that: the gospel of Jesus Christ is proclaimed; the witness of congregations is strengthened; people receive healing, justice and mercy; and the unity that our lord envisioned for the church is realized.” Its ministries include disaster relief, care for the elderly, youth programs, and efforts to fight poverty, especially hunger and homelessness. This collection houses records created by SEPA from 1968 to 2002, as well as the records of SEPA’s predecessors, the Eastern Pennsylvania Synod and the Mininisterium of Pennsylvania. The records date from 1805 to 2002, although the bulk of the collection dates from the 1950s to the 1970s. The records offer information on a variety of topics. They document the general administration and function of SEPA and its predecessors, including their charitable works, urban and rural church ministries, evangelism, social services, interdenominational work and religious education. The records also contain information on many prominent social issues, such as racial issues, abortion, homosexuality, housing discrimination, public and private schooling, school bussing, religion in public schools, alcohol addiction, world hunger and immigration, just to name a few . Researchers will find meeting minutes, correspondence, subject files, reports, informational literature, publications, audio tapes and photographs on those topics and more.
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Presbyterian

Converse family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Four generations of the Converse family owned and operated the Christian Observer, a religious newspaper founded by Amasa Converse in 1840. Over the next several decades, the paper became the “leading newspaper in the southern Presbyterian Church, with a circulation larger than all other Presbyterian papers combined” (Converse, p. 381). Amasa’s son, Francis Bartlett Converse, and grandsons, Harry P. Converse and Francis (Frank) Bartlett Converse, Jr. worked on or were affiliated with the newspaper. His great-granddaughter, Marys Converse, became the paper’s managing editor in 1960. The Converse Family papers contains correspondence, financial and legal records, bound volumes, photographs, printed matter and other materials that document the personal and professional lives of Amasa Converse, Francis Bartlett Converse, Harry P. Converse, and Marys Converse—the dynasty that published America’s oldest religious weekly, the Christian Observer, for more than 160 years. The collection is particularly rich in material documenting the operations of the Observer from its inception in the early 1800s to its closure in 1976.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Crane family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Dr. Paul Shields Crane and his wife Sophie (Montgomery) Crane were Presbyterian Church in the U.S. (PCUS) medical missionaries in South Korea from 1947 to 1969. At Jeonju (Chonju), Korea, they established a hospital, medical training program and nursing school, and helped raise significant funds for a needed expansion of the facility. They also worked to eradicate an epidemic of parasitic infections among the population there. Paul and Sophie also served in the Presbyterian Church’s Division of International Mission for many years, touring the globe and visiting the denomination’s medical mission stations in Africa, Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. The Crane Family papers, 1860s-1999, includes slides, photographs, subject files, administrative records, and other materials related to the work of Paul S. and Sophie Crane. The collection is particularly rich in material related to the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.’s (PCUS) twentieth century international medical missionary endeavors.
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Donald Grey Barnhouse papers, circa 1860s-2000s (Presbyterian Historical Society): Donald Grey Barnhouse (1895-1960) was a fundamentalist Presbyterian minister who was pastor of the Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia from 1927 until his death in 1960. A noted expositor of the Bible, Barnhouse travelled throughout the United States and around the world, preaching and hosting “Bible conferences.” He was also a pioneer radio preacher. He began broadcasting radio sermons in the 1920s, eventually launching his own network program, “The Bible Study Hour.” In 1949, he began his famous study of Romans which continued each week for nearly twelve years until his death. Barnhouse founded and was president of the Evangelical Foundation in Philadelphia, which, during his lifetime, managed the business aspects of his ministry in Philadelphia and around the world. He served as editor of the magazines Revelation and Eternity. The Donald Grey Barnhouse Papers, circa 1860s-2000s, includes correspondence, writings, subject files, vital records, photographs, audio recordings and other materials documenting the professional and personal life of Donald Grey Barnhouse. The collection is particularly rich in material related to Barnhouse’s Christian media ministry.
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Frank Augustus Brown papers, 1901-1967 (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Frank Augustus Brown (1876-1967) was a Presbyterian minister and missionary in China, serving with his wife Charlotte Thompson Brown in that country from 1910 to 1950. The Frank Augustus Brown collection houses the personal records of Frank A. and Charlotte T. Brown. This collection, which dates from approximately 1901 to 1967, contains personal correspondence, missionary records, writings, sermon and lecture notes, scrapbooks, photographs, postcards, and financial and other personal records. Generally, this collection provides insight into the personal and professional lives of early twentieth century missionaries.
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James Woodruff Allen papers, 1909-1978 (Presbyterian Historical Society):  James Woodruff Allen (1885-1980) served with the Presbyterian Foreign Mission in what was then the Belgium Congo (now Zaire), for the years 1912 to 1958. His life and work is documented here through a small collection of correspondence, diaries, sermons and printed materials dating from 1909 to 1978. A majority of the materials relate to Allen’s personal experience as a missionary in the Belgian Congo (now Zaire), where he worked from 1912 to 1958. Researchers interested in the history of missionary work in the Belgian Congo, or in the personal lives of missionaries, may be interested in this collection. Anthropologists may also be interested in photographs of native life in the Belgian Congo.
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Lacy LeGrand Little photographs and papers, 1889-1940 (1900-1930) (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Lacy Le Grand Little was a Presbyterian minister and one of the founding missionaries of the Jiangyin Mission in China. Arriving in 1895, Little served in Jiangyin for more than thirty years. Together with R.A. Haden, George Worth and others, Little led the mission through a period of significant growth and successful evangelizing, despite continued political strife and warfare in China. The mission grew to include a chapel, hospital and nurses training program, and schools for boys and girls, among other services. The Lacy Le Grand Little photographs and papers document the work of Lacy Le Grand Little, a missionary in China during the early twentieth century. The collection dates from circa 1889 to 1940 and consists mostly of photographs. There is a small sampling of personal papers and maps. The photographs document life in China, the Little family and friends, and students of the schools associated with the Jiangyian Mission.
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Maggie Kuhn papers, 1880-1989 (Presbyterian Historical Society): Margaret E. (Maggie) Kuhn (1905-1995) was a lifelong American activist, most famous for founding the Gray Panthers, an advocacy organization for a wide range of social and political issues, especially senior citizens’ rights, in 1970. She started the organization at age sixty-five, after being forced into retirement by the United Presbyterian Church. The Gray Panthers became known for advocating nursing home reform and fighting “ageism,” claiming that “old people constitute America’s biggest untapped and undervalued human energy source.” She also dedicated her life to fighting for human rights, social and economic justice, global peace, integration and an understanding of mental health issues. The Maggie Kuhn papers, 1880 to 1989, consist of correspondence, administrative documents, printed matter, reports, books, photographs, and other materials documenting Kuhn’s personal life and professional work. The collection is particularly rich in materials related to Kuhn’s work with the Gray Panthers and the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

McKendree Robbins Long papers, 1898-1977 (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Born July 20, 1888 in Statesville, North Carolina, McKendree Robbins Long worked as both pastor and evangelist for the Presbyterian Church (PCUS). Prior to his ministerial work, Long attended Davidson College, the University of Richmond in Virginia, and studied art with the Art Students League of New York. Along with his evangelical work, he dedicated himself to creative works including writing and art. He wrote mostly biblically inspired works that included verses, hymns, plays and narratives. In his later years, Long produced several popular paintings illustrating the book of Revelation. The McKendree Robbins Long papers, 1908-1976, represent Long’s life as a pastor, evangelist, artist and author. In addition to written and printed materials, the papers are comprised of several different formats including original drawings, photographs and sound recordings, with the majority of the material ranging in date from the early 1920s through the early 1970s. Long’s habit of embellishing many of his writings with fanciful illustrations and illumination makes this collection, and Long, particularly unique.
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Miller-Dickey Family papers, 1786-1992 (Chester County Historical Society):  This collection consists of papers of the Cross, Dickey, and Miller families of Chester County, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Maryland. John Miller and his wife, Margaret, emigrated from Scotland to Pennsylvania with their young daughter, Jane, in 1786. Miller, who was trained as a stone cutter in Scotland, developed a thriving marble business in Philadelphia; he also owned a farm in Great Valley, Pennsylvania. John was active in the Philadelphia community; he was an early member of the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society, and a supporter of the Magdalene and Missionary Societies. The papers in this collection consist primarily of personal correspondence, business records, genealogical notes, diaries, and family photographs, of the Cross, Dickey and Miller families. The collection is particularly strong on relationships between women, family health, Presbyterian church, the history of Oxford, Pennsylvania, marble cutting business, and the genealogy of the Miller, Dickey, and Cross families.
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Philip Sheeder Landes papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Philip Sheeder Landes (1883-1967) served in Brazil as a missionary of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A (PCUSA). He made an extensive journey of missionary exploration with the Rev. Franklin Graham, across the states of Baia, Goias, and Mato Grosso.  After years in Mato Grosso, Mr. Landes became the evangelist at large for the PCUSA Central Brazil Mission, from 1930 to 1935. Then he was assigned to Campo Grande, Mato Grosso, to establish new churches in that region. From 1938 to 1939, Mr. Landes returned to Princeton Theological Seminary, where he completed coursework and prepared for his new assignment as professor of Church History and other courses at the Theological Seminary in Campinas, Brazil. There he spent the remainder of his career.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Religious News Service records, circa 1930s-1990s (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Louis Minsky founded Religious News Service in 1934 under the auspices of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. From the start, Religious News Service (RNS) was dedicated to providing authoritative and bias-free news about religion and ethics to both the secular and religious press. Its products included daily and domestic foreign news services, photographs, radio broadcast scripts, and features like “Week in Religion”, “Religious Remarkables” and “Inspirational Editorials”. The Religious News Service records, which dates from the 1930s to 1982, evidences the research and writing of RNS staff and includes news releases, photographic prints, photographic negatives, press clippings, articles and other materials produced and/or disseminated by the RNS. Materials in this collection substantially document the history of Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and Eastern Orthodox religion in the United States and around the world.
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Robert Pierre Johnson papers, 1894-1974 (bulk 1940-1974) (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Robert Pierre Johnson (1914-1974) was a Presbyterian minister who, in 1967, was elected Executive Presbyter of New York City. He was the first black man to be elected to the position. He served pastorates in Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., where he also served as Moderator of the Presbytery of that city. He also served as the pastor of 15th Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., and he served as a field representative of Negro Work in the North and West for the Interboard Commission of New York and as Assistant Secretary to the Department of City and Industrial Work. The Robert Pierre Johnson papers, which dates from 1894 to 1974, consists primarily of sermons and lectures authored by Mr. Johnson, as well as correspondence that he both sent and received. This collection documents the breadth of Mr. Johnson’s pastoral career, with a particular emphasis on his activities as Executive Presbyter of New York City and Moderator of the Presbytery of Washington, D.C., in addition to his involvement with the Civil Rights movement.
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Samuel Hall Chester papers, 1872-1950 (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Samuel Hall Chester (1851-1940) was Presbyterian minister and served as the Executive Secretary of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church, U.S. from 1893 to 1926. This collection, dating from 1872 to 1950, documents the personal and professional life of Chester. Materials include correspondence, writings, scrapbooks and photograph albums. The bulk of this collection documents his work as the Executive Secretary of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States.
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Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633-1980 (Chester County Historical Society):  The families in the Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633 to 1980 (bulk 1685 to 1851) are all related by the marriage of Marianne Smith to Dr. Stephen Harris on April 14, 1833. Both sides of the lineage represented in this collection immigrated to Pennsylvania because of religious persecution in England and Ireland. As Presbyterians and Quakers, they no longer wished to live under a series of laws which forced non-Anglicans out of public office, schools and the church as well as prohibiting meetings for non-Anglican worship. These newcomers contributed to the establishment of the government and religious expression in early Chester County. The documents, covering topics such as land surveying, Native Americans, the Revolutionary War, astronomy, publishing, the iron industry, and religious persecution, provide a broad picture of early Chester County and its residents as they interacted with each other at home and in Philadelphia through business, religious, and social transactions.families.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Vass family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Three generations of the Vass family served the Presbyterian Church, both in the United States and in Congo/Zaire, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lachlan Cumming Vass I ministered in the U.S. South between 1860 and 1896. His son and grandson, Lachlan Cumming Vass II and Lachlan Cumming Vass III, both served at the American Presbyterian Congo Mission (APCM). Vass III’s wife, Winifred (Kellersberger), served with her husband at the APCM, and later published several books and articles on the history of the Presbyterian Church in the Belgian Congo/Zaire. The Vass Family papers, circa 1860s-1999, consist of published works, correspondence, subject files, photographs, lantern slides, glass negatives, and other materials that document the lives of Lachlan Cumming Vass I, Lachlan (Lach) Cumming Vass II, and Winifred (Winnie) Kellersberger Vass. The collection is particularly rich in materials that document the Vass family’s work for the American Presbyterian Congo Mission (APCM) between 1898 and 1910 and from 1940 to 1970.
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W. Stanley Rycroft papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  W. Stanley Rycroft (1899-1993) worked as a missionary, teacher and general advocate for Protestant missions in Latin America and for the separation of church and state in the United States. The W. Stanley Rycroft papers, 1923-1993, consist of writings, correspondence, subject files, photographs and other materials that document Rycroft’s professional work. The collection is particularly rich in materials written by Rycroft, including many articles, book manuscripts, book reviews, pamphlets, addresses and editorials penned by the missionary and church administrator.
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Quaker

A Brief Examination and State of LIberty Spiritual

A Brief Examination and State of LIberty Spiritual

Albert Cook Myers collection on William Penn, 1668-1955 (Chester County Historical Society):  Albert Cook Myers (1874-1960) was a Pennsylvania historian, who dedicated his life’s work to the identification, study and organization of William Penn’s published writings and personal papers. Beginning in 1910, after securing an endorsement from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, he set out to publish The Complete Works of William Penn.  All told, Myers devoted fifty years of his life to this project. Though his publication goals were never realized, he assembled a massive and notable body of information about William Penn. To complete his studies, Myers traveled abroad and throughout the United States. As a result of his efforts, he came to be regarded as an expert on the topic and often spoke publicly on the life and times of William Penn. The Albert Cook Myers research collection of William Penn materials contains the information gathered by Myers in his pursuit to thoroughly research and publish a volume documenting the complete writings of William Penn. Researchers will find Myers’ notes, transcriptions, photocopies of documents, newspaper clippings, various author articles, first editions and other early editions of Penn’s works, picture postcards of places related to Penn, and photos and original manuscript material. The bulk of the collection is “The Manuscript” series, which focuses on Myer’s work on Penn’s own writings. Researchers should be aware that the bulk of the collection is Myers’ notes and only a small portion is original manuscript material related to Penn. The collection spans the dates of 1645 to 1960, however, the bulk of the material was collected and created by Myers from 1910 to 1960.
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Serving at the Japan Friends' Mission

Serving at the Japan Friends' Mission

Bowles family correspondence, 1922-1960 (Haverford College):  The Bowles family was deeply involved with Quaker missionary and relief work during the 20th century. In 1900, the Bowles moved to Japan under the auspices of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and managed the Friends School and established the Tokyo Friends Center. During World War II, the Bowles family moved to Hawaii and worked with war refugees. The Bowles family correspondence consists of correspondence from Gilbert and Minnie Pickett Bowles to their son Gordon Townsend Bowles from 1922 to 1932 and to Gordon Townsend and Jane T. Bowles from 1932 to 1960. This correspondence is essentially family correspondence, but also includes information regarding the Bowles’ Quaker relief work, their views on Quakerism and their day-to-day activities.
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Dillwyn and Emlen family correspondence, 1770-1824, bulk 1783-1819 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Dillwyn and Emlen family was joined in 1795 when Susanna Dillwyn married Samuel Emlen, Jr. Both the Dillwyn and Emlen families were prominent in early America as Quakers and advocates for abolition. This collection consists of five disbound volumes of letters written to and from William Dillwyn of London and his daughter Susanna Dillwyn in America from 1770 to 1795; and thereafter until 1818, to and from Susanna and her husband Samuel Emlen, Jr. of Burlington County, New Jersey. Although Susanna lived almost her entire life apart from her father, their letters are frequent and deal primarily with family matters and kin. However, there is frequent comment concerning such topics as yellow fever; abolitionism and slavery; Native Americans; breast cancer; and American and European politics, including the Napoleonic wars and the embargo, as well as their effects upon trade and merchants in Philadelphia and London.
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Friends in Madagascar

Friends in Madagascar

Douglas and Dorothy Steere collection, 1896-2003 (Haverford College):  Douglas and Dorothy Steere were prominent figures of the Quaker movement in the twentieth century, and deeply committed to the causes of peace and spiritual enrichment. This commitment is evident in their involvement with Quaker-led relief work after World War II, Quaker spiritual retreats, international diplomacy, and Dorothy’s work with the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Douglas taught philosophy at several institutions including Haverford College, and published extensively on topics in Quaker philosophy and history. This collection contains considerable material related to Douglas’s work as a writer, professor, and diplomat. Given his role as a distinguished figure within twentieth-century Quakerism, this material is also relevant to researchers interested in recent Quaker history as a whole. There is also some fascinating material produced and collected by Dorothy related to the Civil Rights movement, including a letter from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
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Elizabeth Gray Vining, 1897-1989 (Haverford College): Elizabeth Gray Vining (1902-1997) was an author of children’s books served as the tutor to the crown prince of Japan, Akihito, from 1946 to 1950. The collection consists of correspondence, materials regarding books authored by Vining, articles, lectures and addresses, photographs and information documenting her and her family’s lives.

How Quakers Meet War, Persecution and Violence

How Quakers Meet War, Persecution and Violence

Harold Chance papers, 1938-1964 (Haverford College):  Harold J. Chance (1898-1975) worked for peace education through the American Friends Service Committee, the Peace Caravans, the Youth Section of the Emergency Peace Campaign, the Institute of International Relations, and the Friends Peace Service from 1934-1964. Included in the Harold Chance papers are correspondence, journals, writings, mailings, reports, and materials on the Friends Peace Service. Also included are Harold Haines Brinton’s (1884-1973) lectures and course notes on topics such as history and religion, mysticism in various religions, religion and social change, and the philosophy of pacifism. Researchers will find this collection is especially rich in Quaker history, specifically relating to the discussion of the use of the Quaker voice by individual Friends’ groups, in the mid 1950s.
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Howard Haines Brinton and Anna Shipley Cox Brinton papers, 1859-2005 (Haverford College): Howard Haines Brinton and Anna Shipley Cox Brinton were 20th-century Quaker educators and prolific authors whose areas of expertise included the physical sciences and the Classics. Notably, they also worked for the American Friends Service Committee in Europe, for Friends Center in Tokyo, Japan, and as directors of Pendle Hill, an adult study center in Wallingford, PA. They were both recorded ministers in the Religious Society of Friends. This collection also contains materials of other Brinton, Bean, Cox and Shipley Family members.

A Draft of a Catechism Christian Doctrine

A Draft of a Catechism Christian Doctrine

James Wood papers, 1865-1964, bulk 1865-1921 (Haverford College):  James Wood (1839-1925) was “interested in education, philanthropy, in the various branches of agriculture, in archaeology, history, Indian lore, anthropology, science, in prison reform and above all, in the Bible and religion,” (ABS, 2). He was also a business man, serving as President of the Genesee Salt Company in Piffard, New York. The James Wood papers are divided into twelve series: “Biographical Material:” “Agriculture;” Business and Financial Material;” “Collected Quaker Material;” “Correspondence;” “Hugh Barbour Writings and Talks regarding James Wood;” “Journals;” “Organizations;” “Photographs and Albums;” “Political Involvement;” Prison Reform;” and lastly, “Writings by James Wood.” This collection contains many materials, including correspondence, photographs, record books, awards, and printed material such as newspapers and pamphlets. Given Wood’s heavy involvement in agriculture, this collection has high research value for those interested in farming methods, live stock breeding, and general agriculture history from the late nineteenth to early-twentieth centuries. Also of note to researchers is a series covering Wood’s work in female prison reform, which includes several official reports and newspaper stories in this area.
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John Dickinson's Bible

John Dickinson's Bible

Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Logan family was a prominent Philadelphia family dating back to 1699, when James Logan, the family patriarch, arrived in Philadelphia to serve as the first secretary of the Pennsylvania colony. Through work in agriculture and politics, Logan and his descendants were intimately involved in the development of the Pennsylvania colony and, later, the fledging United States. James Logan’s prominence resulted in connections, both professional and familial, with other prominent colonial families, including the Norris and Dickinson families. The Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (bulk 1670-1872), documents James Logan’s personal and professional life, as well as that of several generations of his descendents. There are papers documenting the lives of his son William, his grandson George Logan, his great-grandsons Albanus Charles Logan and Algernon Sydney Logan, and the subsequent relationships with the Dickinson and Norris families. John Dickinson, who married one of James Logan’s descendents, is well documented in this collection as are his activities with the Pennsylvania and Delaware governments and his legal practice. This collection is rich in the history of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Delaware, the formation of the colony of Pennsylvania, the relationship of early colonials with the Native Americans, the bid for independence and the later formation of the United States of America. Included in the papers are correspondence, legal records, estate records, financial records, land and property records, diaries, and writings. Not only are prominent political figures (James Logan, George Logan, and John Dickinson) well documented in this collection, but women are also well documented, largely thanks to Deborah Norris Logan who kept a diary for most of her adult life. Her diaries and letters and those of some of her female relations reveal a glimpse into the lives of educated and prominent women in the Philadelphia area during the 18th and 19th centuries.
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Penn family papers (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Penn family papers house the personal and governmental records of William Penn, the proprietor of Pennsylvania, and his family. This collection, which dates from 1592 to 1960 (bulk of materials dating 1629 to 1834), consists primarily of correspondence, legal records, governmental records, surveys, deeds, grants, receipts, and account books; there are also 19th and 20th century auction catalogs and other secondary materials. This collection documents the creation of the Pennsylvania colony through records created by William Penn and his associates. The records continue beyond this and document the development of the colony through the records of Penn’s descendants. These records reveal valuable insights into Penn’s relations with American Indians, the Pennsylvania/Maryland border dispute, government framework, as well private correspondence between family members and close associates.
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A Letter from Elias Hicks

A Letter from Elias Hicks

Reinhardt, Hawley and Hewes family papers, 1762-1955 (Haverford College): The Reinhardt, Hawley, Hewes and Meredith families are tied together through marriage and their Quaker faith across multiple generations. William Dell Reinhardt, a University of Pennsylvania graduate and doctor, married Rebecca Hawley, a teacher. They had six children: Jesse Hawley Reinhardt, Mary Bailey Reinhardt, Esther Meredith Reinhardt, Lydia Ludwig Reinhardt, Elizabeth Christina Reinhardt, and David Jones Reinhardt. David Jones Reinhardt married Anna Margaret Hewes in 1896. These individuals created the bulk of the material contained within this collection. This collection consists of correspondence; account books; certificates; diaries and household information lists; friendship books; land and insurance records; marriage certificates; miscellaneous family records; wills and estates; genealogical research; photographs; Quaker tracts and poetry; newspaper clippings; and Acts of the Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania. Before looking into the collection, a researcher should take advantage of the book, The Reinhardts and Hawleys of Chester County, PA: Lives and Letters, Also Including Related Families of Meredith, Mendenhall, Pugh, Etc. and the Hewes of Salem County, NJ, by Ann M. P. McCormack, which includes duplicated copies of much of this collection with family interpretation. Most of the letters have been transcribed which is extremely helpful as the handwriting of the Reinhardts, Hawleys, Hewes, Mendenhalls and Merediths is frequently difficult to read. This collection will be of great interest to researchers interested in Quaker families, specifically in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The collection includes a wealth of documentation of family life for over a hundred years from the late 1700s to the early 1900s.
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Rufus M. Jones papers, 1860-1997 (Haverford College): Rufus Matthew Jones was born on January 25, 1863 in South China, Maine. His parents were Edwin and Mary Gifford Hoxie Jones. Their family had been Quakers, and he was brought up in a spartan and religious household. By his own estimate, Rufus M. Jones was deeply influenced as a child by his Aunt Peace Jones for her life of Quaker homily and, as a young man, the spirituality and philosophical powers of oratory and discourse of his other aunt and uncle, the ministers Eli and Sybil Jones. He attended Oak Grove Seminary, later Moses Brown School and then Haverford College where he received a B.A. in history in 1885. After graduation, he taught Greek, Latin, German, surveying, astronomy and zoology at Oakwood Seminary from 1885-1886 and received an M.A. from Haverford in 1886. He went abroad in 1886-1887 with his friend, Charles Jacob to study German and philosophy at Heidelberg University and to visit Ellen Claire Pearsall in Scotland. During a month in France, he had a mystical experience in the bosky environment of Dieu le Fit during which he realized his life’s work was in the realm of mystical religion. During his years of study of mysticism, he developed criteria by which the objectivity of a mystical experience might be verified. The collection consists of Rufus Jones’ correspondence, diaries, financial papers, manuscripts, Haverford College class notes, short talks, photographs, medals and artifacts and material relating to Jones. In addition, there are the correspondence and photographs of Elizabeth Bartram Cadbury Jones, his wife, and of Mary Hoxie Jones, his daughter. Topics of importance in this collection are Rufus Jones’ teaching, his writing and editing, his religious beliefs, his efforts toward the reunification of branches within the Society of Friends, his work for various service organizations, peace issues, his friendships and his family.

Baptism of Christ

Baptism of Christ

Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers 1791-1930, bulk 1840-1882 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers house the correspondence of a Quaker family who lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Woodbury, New Jersey; Wilmington, Delaware; and other surrounding areas from approximately 1840 to 1882. A majority of the letters were written to or by Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles; her husband, John Smith Hilles; and other Tatum or Hilles family members. There is a small sampling of assorted family papers, dating from 1825 to 1901. Included, among other items, are school report cards of William Samuel Hilles from Haverford College and an 1834 memoir of Anne Cooper Tatum, Sarah Hilles’ mother. In addition, there are deeds to properties owned by the Hilles family in Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois and Pennsylvania from 1791 to 1886.
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Quaker Theological Discussion Group

Quaker Theological Discussion Group

Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers, 1824-1963, bulk 1824-1930 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers indicate strong relationships and family ties that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries. Sarah Wistar Rhoads (1839-1920) married William Gibbons Rhoads (1838-1880) on November 28, 1866. At that time, the Rhoads, Gibbons and Wistar families began corresponding, the result being an outstanding collection illustrating family support, friendship and love. These papers include correspondence, financial records, diaries and journals, memorabilia, classwork and notes, copied poems, prayers, sermons and verses, memorials, genealogical research, Quaker material and photographs. Researchers interested in family papers and Quaker family dynamics, social life, and customs may find this collection extremely useful.
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Smiley family papers, 1885-1983 (Haverford College): In 1883, Quakers Albert Keith Smiley and his brother Daniel Smiley organized the first annual conference to discuss assistance to Native Americans at their estate at Lake Mohonk in New York state. These conferences were widely attended by specialists in various fields, as well as important officials. Only later were Native Americans represented, but they did come. The concern to “uplift” was also directed at Filipino, Hawaiian, African American and Puerto Rican peoples, though attention at the conferences was primarily focused on Native Americans.

Letters

Letters

Taylor and Nicholson family papers, 1810-1999, bulk 1869-1944 (Haverford College):  The Taylor and Nicholson family papers contain the records of these two families from the late-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. The two focal points of this collection are William Nicholson Taylor (1882-1945), and his mother, Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor (1857-1944). William graduated from Harvard in 1903 and afterwards spent considerable time abroad studying architecture. He also served as an officer in the United States Military from 1916 to 1917, and worked in diplomacy after the war. Rebecca was a noted writer and poet during this time period. The strength of this collection is the collected materials related to William’s time in the military, as well as his sketchbooks related to architecture and Harvard. Researchers interested in the works of Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor or Quaker women, should also consult Rebecca’s notebook and correspondence. There is extensive correspondence between the various members of these two families from the 1880s to 1940s.
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Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633-1980 (Chester County Historical Society):  The families in the Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633 to 1980 (bulk 1685 to 1851) are all related by the marriage of Marianne Smith to Dr. Stephen Harris on April 14, 1833. Both sides of the lineage represented in this collection immigrated to Pennsylvania because of religious persecution in England and Ireland. As Presbyterians and Quakers, they no longer wished to live under a series of laws which forced non-Anglicans out of public office, schools and the church as well as prohibiting meetings for non-Anglican worship. These newcomers contributed to the establishment of the government and religious expression in early Chester County. The documents, covering topics such as land surveying, Native Americans, the Revolutionary War, astronomy, publishing, the iron industry, and religious persecution, provide a broad picture of early Chester County and its residents as they interacted with each other at home and in Philadelphia through business, religious, and social transactions.
Explore the Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers using the collection guide »

Theodore Brinton Hetzel papers and graphics, 1866-1987 (Haverford College): Theodore Hetzel (1906-1990) was a Quaker professor of engineering at Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania whose interests led him to involvement with Native American and Quaker issues. An avid photographer, the materials in this collection are primarily photographic, as well as correspondence and documents.

Yearly Meeting Held at Philadelphia

Yearly Meeting Held at Philadelphia

Vaux family papers, 1708-1995, bulk 1912-1932 (Haverford College):  The Vaux family was deeply involved with Quaker and Native American affairs throughout much of the nineteenth and early 20th centuries. George Vaux, Sr. was involved in Quaker activity through the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and other Quaker meetings throughout the world (including Antigua and London). Both George Vaux, Jr. and his sister Mary Morris Vaux Walcott served as commissioners for the U.S. Board of Indian Commissioners. This organization was established by the United States Congress in 1869 to watch over federal policies regarding Native Americans and to make certain that treaty obligations were fulfilled, especially in reference to supply deliveries. George Vaux, III also worked as the treasurer of the Indian Committee of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Within the collection are letters, reports, photographs, land surveys, and administrative records. This collection may be of special interest to researchers who are studying both the history and recent state of affairs of Native Americans in the United States. Of note in the collection are original Department of Interior documents, first-hand written accounts, and letters. Also, of great note are the land surveys, which provide valuable information from the early 1920s regarding the health, education, population, and land ownership of Native Americans, as well as maps, and photographs.
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Waln family papers, 1759-1888 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Walns were a family of prominent Quaker merchants in Philadelphia. In 1774, Richard Waln, moved the family to Crosswicks, in Monmouth County, New Jersey, where he purchased “Walnford” and established a flour mill. The Waln family papers document primarily the family’s business activities. Richard Waln (1737-1808) who was engaged in the milling business in Walnford, New Jersey, also was involved with financial concerns in Philadelphia. His nephew Robert (1765-1836) was the director of the Philadelphia Insurance Company from 1804 to 1813. Robert a successful merchant, joined into a partnership with his cousin Jesse, and traded with England and the West Indies, and later with East India and China. The collection consists largely of correspondence and financial records.

William W. Cadbury and Catherine J. Cadbury collection, 1893-1970 (Haverford College): William Warder Cadbury was born on 1877 Oct 15 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joel and Anna Kaighn Cadbury and he was a birthright member of the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Western District (now called the Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting). In 1911 he married Sarah. I. Manatt; she died shortly after in 1912. Then, in 1917 he married Catherine Balderston Jones and had three daughters, Jane B. Cadbury, Emma Cadbury, and Catherine C. Cadbury. From 1909 to 1941 they worked as medical missionaries in China. Their correspondence and diaries detail much of the unrest and tumultuous events that took place in China during this time. The correspondence specifically mentions Sun Yat Sen and Cheng Kai Shek as well as the general feelings of the Chinese people.

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