Medicine

American Red Cross Military Hospital No. 1 in Neuilly-sur-Seine during World War I.

American Red Cross Military Hospital No. 1 in Neuilly-sur-Seine during World War I.

Alma A. Clark papers, 1914-1946 (Bryn Mawr College):  Alma A. Clarke was an American who volunteered in World War I helping French orphans through the Committee France-America for the Protection of the Children of the Frontier and as a Red Cross Auxiliary Nurse in the American Red Cross Military Hospital No. 1 in Neuilly-sur-Seine. The Alma A. Clarke papers provide an in depth view into a World War I nurse’s memories and views on her service in France. For the most complete view of Clarke’s experiences in France, a researcher should first examine the “Scrapbooks.” Researchers interested in World War I, the American Red Cross, nursing in World War I, hospitals in World War I and children as victims of war will find this to be an extremely valuable resource. Not only does this collection reveal Clarke’s memories of the War through her collected material, photographs, and documents, it also reveals the way in which both the United States and France promoted their cause through patriotic materials as well as how the countryside and citizens of France were affected by World War I. This collection provides perspective on the War from the viewpoints of children orphaned by the war, nurses exposed to the long term effects of battle, and the soldiers who did not survive the war without physical wounds.
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In Jellico, Tennesee

In Jellico, Tennesee

American Women’s Hospital Service photographs, 1917-1982 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  The American Women’s Hospitals (AWH) developed from the War Service Committee of the Medical Women’s National Association (later called the American Medical Women’s Association) in 1917, to provide, register and finance American women physicians for war work; to offer medical and emergency relief to refugees; and, later, to provide international public health service. In 1959, AWH became an independent agency and remained such until 1982 when it re-merged with the American Medical Women’s Association. The collection houses photographs created by the American Women’s Hospitals Service (AWHS) from 1917 to 1982 to document and promote the organization’s efforts to provide health care to under-serviced populations in the United States and abroad. The photographs were frequently used in fundraising and publicity campaigns. As a result, many are annotated to identify the primary subject, geographic location and, occasionally, individuals, providing a graphic chronicle of the variety and forms of AWHS fieldwork worldwide. Researchers will find images of field and clinic work conducted in Africa, Albania, Bolivia, France, Greece, India, Korea, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, United States, Vietnam and Yugoslavia, to name a few. In addition, there are a few files at the end containing portraits of AWHS personnel and significant women in medicine that were also associated with the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. In addition to the photographic record, this collection also includes a few files of Dr. Esther Lovejoy correspondence and written material used by a Dr. Morani to prepare for a lecture in 1974.
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Anny Elston in her office in New York, New York.

Anny Elston in her office in New York, New York.

Anny Elston papers, 1918-1976, bulk 1944-1972 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Anny Elston (1895-1975), a German born and trained pediatrician, immigrated to the United States in 1941 due to the “Racial Laws” in Nazi Germany. After obtaining her New York State Medical License in 1942, she began practicing medicine in New York City until retiring in 1972. The Anny Elston papers include information regarding Dr. Elston’s medical credentials and continuing education, her medical practice in New York City, and patient records.
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Census of Women Physicians

Census of Women Physicians

Bertha Van Hoosen papers, 1913-1971, bulk 1920-1950 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Bertha Van Hoosen (1863-1952), a doctor specializing in obstetrics and gynecology in Chicago, IL, founded the American Medical Women’s Association. Her collection includes correspondence, journal articles, plans for a Medical Women’s Library at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, teaching material, images and bibliographic material regarding women in medicine. A large part of the collection concerns Van Hoosen’s interests in the National Medical Women’s Association, later the American Medical Women’s Association and the Medical Women’s Library. There are also photographic images, x-rays and illustrations of medical case studies conducted by Van Hoosen.
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Medical Office

Medical Office

Bradford collection, 1847-1918 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Dr. Thomas L. Bradford (1847-1918) was a practicing homeopathic physician in Maine, Europe and Philadelphia. While practicing and teaching in Philadelphia he served as curator for the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia. From 1896 to 1916, he collected, organized and maintained material for 35 scrapbooks of biographical information about homeopathic physicians.
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Constitution and By-Laws

Constitution and By-Laws

Chicago Woman’s Medical College/Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School records, 1870-1924, 1947 (Drexel University College of Medicine): The Woman’s Hospital Medical College of Chicago was founded in 1870 by Mary H. Thompson (1829-1895) and Dr. William Heath Byford (1817-1890) in order to provide equal education opportunities for female medical students in the Chicago area. In 1879, the name of the medical school was changed to the Woman’s Medical College of Chicago; and in 1892, it was taken over by the Northwestern University and renamed the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School. Over the next ten years, financial difficulties arose and in 1902, the medical school was dismantled. The Woman’s Clinical Dispensary, “a working corps of clinical teachers and assistants” who held clinics, survived until 1907. This collection documents the Chicago Woman’s Medical College and its transitions to the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School from 1870 to 1945, with the bulk of the material created from 1870 to 1924. The collection consists of Alumnae Association material, alumnae biographies, correspondence, histories of the college, alumnae surveys, annual announcements, reports, minutes, and correspondence, as well as limited information on the Woman’s Clinical Dispensary.
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Documenting the study of Phrenology

Documenting the study of Phrenology

College of Physicians of Philadelphia Library records, 1882-2005 (College of Physicians):  Established in 1788, the Library of the College of Physicians served as Philadelphia’s central medical library for over 150 years, serving its medical schools, hospitals, physicians and other health professionals. Today, it is an independent research library devoted to the history of medicine and serves hundreds of scholars, health professionals, students and popular writers each year. The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Library records (1882 to 2005) extensively documents the administration of the College Library, as well as its public services and functions. The collection includes the papers of several librarians, curators, and other library staff, such as Andrea Kenyon, Marjorie Smink, Thomas A. Horrocks, and Anthony Aguirre. The collection is largely comprised of correspondence, reports and records. There are also a fair amount of photographs, microfilm, and bound catalogue volumes.
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Science and Medicine Symposium

Science and Medicine Symposium

College of Physicians of Philadelphia Office of the Executive Director records, 1953-2003 (College of Physicians):  The Office of the Executive Director is the lead office in charge of administering the business of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. The Executive Director oversees the activities of the College of Physicians staff including staff of the Historical Medical Library, the Mütter Museum, the Francis Clark Wood Institute, and the Finance Department. The Executive Director also oversees the College functions of institutional advancement, communications, membership, and special events. As a result, the records in this collection document the everyday administrative activities and governance of the College, and span the years 1953 to 2003 (Bulk 1977 to 2003). Documents consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports, pamphlets of outside organizations, financial reports, minutes, and agendas. This collection is divided into six series; the first three series house the records of specific executive directors: “William F. Chaveas” (1978-1986), “John O’Donnell” (1987-1995), and “Marc Micozzi” (1995-2002). The fourth series, “Office Records,” contains general office files from the Executive Director’s office. Other series include the records produced during the “Executive Director Search” in 2002 and the records created by the College of Physicians during its participation in the creation of the “Health Sciences Library Consortium” (HSLC).
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Committee on the Mütter Museum, records of the Chairman, 1926-1970 (College of Physicians):  The Committee on the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia was charged with the general supervision of the anatomical and pathological museum established by the articles of agreement made between the College and Thomas D. Mütter in 1858-1859. The chairman of the committee was to report annually on the condition of the museum and semi-annually on its financial situation. The collection contains the correspondence and financial files of chairmen of the Committee of the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, 1926-1970, documenting the acquisitions and oversight of the Museum and College Collections.
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Documenting the study of Homeopathy.

Documenting the study of Homeopathy.

Constantine Hering and Calvin B. Knerr Family Papers, 1820-2003, bulk 1820-1940 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Dr. Constantine Hering (1800-1880), born and educated in Germany, immigrated to Philadelphia in 1833 and devoted his life to the study, practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States. As such, he is considered the father of homeopathy in America. Hering founded several schools and organizations devoted to teaching homeopathy, especially the North American Academy of the Homeopathic Healing Arts, aka the Allentown Academy, in 1836, and the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1848. Hering’s pupil and eventual son-in-law and professional assistant, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr, also practiced homeopathy. Knerr was integrally involved in the editing of two of Hering’s books and also devoted much time and effort to writing Hering’s biography, “The Life of Hering.” This collection primarily houses papers of Dr. Constantine Hering and his son-in-law, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr from 1820 to 1940. To a significantly lesser extent, the collection documents the North American Academy of the Homoeopathic Healing Arts, as well as the Hering, Knerr and Husmann families. The collection is comprised of correspondence; printed materials and publications, especially articles written by Hering; manuscripts; notes; diaries; medical school notebooks; family photographs; and other records; which evidence the life and work of Hering, Knerr and their families, as well as the practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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Pathology reports

Pathology reports

Edward Krumbhaar papers, 1886-1992 (College of Physicians):  Edward Bell Krumbhaar (1882-1966) was a distinguished pathologist and cardiac physician, as well as one of Philadelphia’s leading historians of medicine. A founder of both the Section on Medical History of the College of Physicians and the American Association of the History of Medicine (AAHM), Krumbhaar also served as president of the College and of the AAHM. The E.B. Krumbhaar papers cover Krumbhaar’s accomplishments and contributions to pathology and cardiac physiology from the early to mid-twentieth century. This collection contains Krumbhaar’s research files, administrative records related to organizations and institutions in which he was involved, correspondence, and medical writings. Particular strengths include documentation of Krumbhaar’s research on pathology, the founding of the American Association for the History of Medicine in 1930 and 1931, his service as President of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia from 1939 to 1942, his professorship of Pathology at the University of Pennsylvania from 1927 to 1942, and his translation of Arturo Castiglioni’s History of Medicine in 1941.
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Youth at Elm Hill

Youth at Elm Hill

Elm Hill Private School and Home for the Education of Feeble-Minded Youth records, 1842-1951 (College of Physicians):  Elm Hill Private School and Home for the Education of Feeble-Minded Youth was founded in 1848 in Barre, Massachusetts, by physician Hervey Backus Wilbur (1820-1883). Wilbur left Elm Hill in 1851 to establish a similar but state-sponsored school in New York. His assistant, George Brown (1823-1892), took over the institution. The records of Elm Hill span the years 1842-1951. The records consist of Administrative records, Correspondence, Financial records, Medical records, Teaching records, and photographs and engravings of residents and employees.
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Fight Cancer with Knowledge

Fight Cancer with Knowledge

Frank Hartman papers, 1904-1977 (College of Physicians):  Frank Janczak Hartman (1893-1986) was a radium specialist and consultant who worked as a “radium hound,” searching for pieces lost by area hospitals and industry until his retirement in 1956. The Frank J. Hartman papers provide an insightful view into the changes atomic energy brought to society. Hartman, who owned two companies dealing with radium, clearly saw the product’s value, but he also recognized the potential dangers and the damage that could result from the improper usage, storage and disposal of these materials. This collection will be extremely valuable to a researcher interested in Frank J. Hartman; the radium industry, sales and recovery; atomic energy in Canada; the history of the discovery of radium and the Curie family; and how atomic energy affected the United States.
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List of Graduates

List of Graduates

George A. Hay Collection of Administrative Files of the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1890-1970, bulk 1925-1965 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  From 1925 to 1970, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMC) underwent significant change, adapting to both survive and prosper in a transforming society. Administrative change was brought about and explored to spark institutional growth and/or to mollify financial stress. Among the more significant events in the College’s history was the 1930 move to new and larger facilities in East Falls, and an administrative reorganization in 1942. In the 1940s and 1960s, WMC also explored the financial and administrative benefits of merging with other institutions in the Philadelphia area; Kensington Women’s Hospital and the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Jefferson Medical College. Amidst all of the change, WMC continued to honor its traditions and celebrate milestones, especially its Centennial Anniversary in 1950. In 1970, the College made the decision to admit male students for the first time and change its name to the Medical College of Pennsylvania. The George A. Hay Collection of Administrative Files is a assemblage of records created by various administrators of the Woman’s College of Medicine from 1925 to 1965. Creators of the records include: George A. Hay, comptroller; Sarah Logan Wister Starr, president of the Board of Corporators; Vida Hunt Francis, secretary; Dr. Ellen Culver Potter, a member of the faculty as well as acting president in the 1940s; and others. In addition, there is a small sampling of very early administrative records, that are dated 1796, and from 1861 to 1928. Those files include a deed to land in East Falls in Philadelphia, report cards, correspondence and other materials. Generally speaking, the records housed in this collection evidence the day to day administration of the college, especially relating to its finances; financial planning; fundraising; future needs of the college; and a few significant landmarks in institutional history, the 1942 administrative reorganization, the 1950 Centennial Celebration, and explored institutional mergers with Jefferson Medical College, Kensington Women’s Hospital and Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
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Hatfield and Hibernia Park records, 1743-1975 (Chester County Archives): The County of Chester owns the Hatfield and Hibernia estates, both of which played parts in the early iron industry in Pennsylvania. The families who lived on those estates (the Hatfields, Downings, Brookes and Swaynes, to name only a few) were involved with other ventures such as a general store and a convalescence home. The Hatfield and Hibernia Park records document the families, businesses, and property transfers of the families living in the Hatfield and Hibernia homes from the 1700s to the 1900s. Researchers interested in land and property records, iron works, 19th century general stores, and rest homes will find this collection to be extremely valuable.
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Practice Good Hygiene ... for a Popular You!

Practice Good Hygiene ... for a Popular You!

Health Policy Advisory Center (Health/PAC) records (Temple University Special Collections):  The Health Political Advisory Center, a health advocacy and research organization, was based in New York City and active from 1968 until 1977. The policies advocated by Health/PAC were largely left-wing and socialist health care programs, with special attention given to national health insurance, patients’ rights, and health care for disadvantaged, minority, and/or immigrant populations. The main purpose of Health/PAC was to spread information and foster activism through publications, conferences, and other events. Health/PAC published a variety of pamphlets, newsletters, bibliographies, and two books: The American Health Empire (1971) and Prognosis Negative (1976). The organization’s newsletter, The Bulletin, was published regularly from 1968 until the late 1990s. After Health/PAC closed in 1977, The Bulletin’s publication was carried out by a volunteer board of editors. This collection contains papers relating to Health/PAC’s primary functions and operation. The materials date from 1945 to 1985, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1965 to 1977. This collection includes research on various health and health care issues gathered by Health/PAC, Health/PAC’s newsletter ( The Bulletin), and correspondence with doctors, activists and politicians. Though the organization was based in New York City, Health/PAC was interested in health and health care globally, the materials collected by the organization reflect that interest, with records covering health care events and issues throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. Of particular interest are the materials about changes in women’s health care during this time period; mental health and the treatment of mental illnesses; drug abuse; the Marxist, Socialist, and Communist movements within the United States and their relationship to health care issues; and specific health events that occurred during the 1960s and 1970s, such as Legionnaire’s Disease and the swine flu outbreak of 1976.
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Letter from Mary E. Walker

Letter from Mary E. Walker

Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker, circa 1850-1946 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Lida Poynter collection on Dr. Mary E. Walker consists of Poynter’s unpublished manuscript and research notes on the life of Dr. Mary E. Walker. Mary E. Walker (1832-1919) was a physician who served as a surgeon during the Civil War. She was awarded the Medal of Honor for her service and remains the only woman to have received the Medal. Throughout her life, she wrote, lectured and taught on medicine, dress reform, suffrage, and women’s rights, in general. In addition to Poynter’s manuscript and research notes, this collection features correspondence to and from Mary Walker, correspondence to and from Lida Poynter, and photographs of Mary Walker.
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Textbooks used by the Logans

Textbooks used by the Logans

Logan family papers, 1684-1925 (Library Company of Philadelphia): The Logan family was prominent in Philadelphia from the start of the province, serving the people in many capacities, including political, medical and literary. This is a collection of manuscripts obtained by the Library Company of Philadelphia that relates to the Logan family. The collection includes papers of the Logan family members Albanus Charles, Algernon Sydney, Deborah Norris, William Jr., and James as well as family materials collected by Frances A. Logan and William Logan Fox. The collection dates from 1684 to 1925 and consists of family papers, correspondence, diaries, writings, medical texts, lecture notes, financial records, poetry, visiting cards, and invitations.
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Sketch of the Life and Work of Joseph S. Longshore

Sketch of the Life and Work of Joseph S. Longshore

Longshore family papers, 1819-1902 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women’s education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence.
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The Mutter Giant

The Mutter Giant

Mutter Museum records, 1887-2006 (College of Physicians):  The Mütter Museum was founded in 1856 when Dr. Thomas Dent Mütter bequeathed his personal medical museum to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. From Thomas Mütter’s collection, the museum grew as a noted repository for unique collections of medical specimens across the world. The Mütter Museum Records cover the records of this noted institution from 1887 until 2006. The history of this institution is documented through catalogs of item acquisitions, visitor records, event records, and the papers of several museum curators. Researchers interested in the acquisition policies of the museum, as well as records of events and exhibits held at the Mutter should consult this collection. Additionally, the papers of Gretchen Worden are housed in this collection. The Gretchen Worden series contains many of her lectures, administrative material, and date books while serving as Curator and Director from 1982 until 2004. Also of note in the collection is the “Index of Collection,” that lists many of the Mütter’s acquisition for the museum during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as a “Journal of Giants,” containing the records of known American cases of gigantism in the 1930s compiled by the Mütter Museum.
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Philadelphia General Hospital Committee on the Celebration at the Philadelphia General Hospital of the 200th Anniversary of the building of the Philadelphia Almshouse records, 1929-1939 (College of Physicians): The Committee on the Celebration at the Philadelphia General Hospital of the 200th Anniversary of the Building of the Philadelphia Almshouse was established in September 1929. The committee, consisting of five members of the Medical Board of the Philadelphia General Hospital, was appointed by the President of the Medical Board. The committee was responsible for fund raising, promotion, planning the program, selecting speakers, and making out the guest list. The bicentennial celebration was initially planned for December 1931. In August 1931, due to lack of funds, the committee decided to postpone the celebration until the following year. The bicentennial was finally celebrated on 6 December 1932. The records of the Committee on the Celebration at the Philadelphia General Hospital of the 200th Anniversary of the Building of the Philadelphia Almshouse span 1929 to 1939; most of the records date from 1931 to 1932. The collection consists of the files of Robert J. Hunter, chairman of the committee. Most of the files are correspondence files containing incoming letters and copies of Hunter’s outgoing letters. The correspondence, which is primarily with other committee members, concerns the planning and organization of the bicentennial celebration held at the Philadelphia General Hospital in December 1932. Also included are regret and acceptance letters from people who were invited to the celebration.
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Philadelphia General Hospital Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum Committee museum collection records, 1730-1960 (College of Physicians): The Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum Committee was established in December 1940. The committee was responsible for the daily administration of the Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum of the Philadelphia General Hospital. The committee attended to the maintenance of the museum building, oversaw the care and cataloging of museum pieces, and acknowledged donations to the museum. This committee reported to the Medical Board of the Philadelphia General Hospital. This collection consists of items, dating from 1730 to 1960, from the museum collection of the Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum of the Philadelphia General Hospital. Present are letters, invitations, programs, reprints, photographs, a diary, and miscellaneous material relating to the history of the Philadelphia General Hospital. Also included are the papers of individuals who were important to the history of the hospital, including Daniel J. McCarthy, Arthur A. Stevens, and Sir William Osler. Most of the material was collected by Robert J. Hunter, Chairman of the Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum Committee.
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Philadelphia General Hospital Osler Memorial Committee records, 1894-1941 (College of Physicians): The Osler Memorial Committee was formed in October 1939. The committee was appointed by David Riesman, President of the Medical Board of the Philadelphia General Hospital. The objective of the committee was to create a museum and memorial to Sir William Osler in the old autopsy house of the Philadelphia General Hospital and to organize a ceremony marking the dedication of the building. After the completion of its duties, the Osler Memorial Committee was discharged in December 1940. At this time, it was decided that a new committee, the Osler Memorial and Blockley Historical Museum Committee, would be appointed to oversee the daily administration of the museum. The records of the Osler Memorial Committee span 1894 to 1941; the bulk of the records date from 1940 to 1941. The collection consists of the files of Robert J. Hunter, chairman of the committee. Included in Hunter’s files is material relating to the restoration of the old autopsy house at the Philadelphia General Hospital and its transformation into a museum and memorial to Sir William Osler. Also included are materials pertaining to the dedication of the building held on June 8, 1940. The collection contains correspondence, minutes, reports, notes, memoranda, programs, invitations, and drafts of speeches.
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Philadelphia General Hospital Training School for Nurses duty registers, 1885-1911 (College of Physicians): In September 1883, the Board of Guardians of Philadelphia General Hospital decided to establish a training school for nurses. At first, the program could be completed in one year; eventually, the program was expanded to include three years of course work. By 1931, the school had certified almost 2,000 nurses. This collection of duty registers of the Training School for Nurses of the Philadelphia General Hospital consists of fifteen bound volumes dating from 1885 to 1911. The volumes contain information about the daily staffing of nurses in the different wards of the Philadelphia General Hospital. These records provide insight into the management of the hospital and the lives of the nurses who worked there.
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Causes of Death and Ages at Time of Death

Causes of Death and Ages at Time of Death

Philadelphia Memorial Park records, 1850-1969 (Chester County Historical Society):  Philadelphia Memorial Park was established in 1929 as an independent burial ground. The graves from at least four inner-city burial grounds were relocated to Philadelphia Memorial Park during the mid-twentieth century:  United American Mechanics Cemetery, administered by the  United American Mechanics and United Daughters of America Cemetery Association; German Lutheran Cemetery; Union Burial Ground; and Belvue Cemetery. This collection contains Philadelphia Memorial Park’s burial records relating to Belvue Cemetery, German Lutheran Cemetery, Union Burial Ground, and United American Mechanics Cemetery. These records were inherited by Philadelphia Memorial Park when the graves were transferred. Included in the collection are account books, burial listings, correspondence, deeds, lot records, minutes, and receipts. The collection also includes ephemera and lot purchase information for Philadelphia Memorial Park. United American Mechanics Cemetery is the best represented of the included burial grounds.
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Putrid bilious intestinal Remitting Fever

Putrid bilious intestinal Remitting Fever

Rush family papers, 1748-1876 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Rush Family papers includes material from Benjamin Rush, physician, social activist, educator, writer and patriot; his brother Jacob Rush, lawyer, Supreme Court judge, and patriot; and Benjamin’s son James Rush, physician and Treasurer of the United States Mint. These American men were “strong characters, zealous patriots during the stirring period in which they lived, tenacious of their convictions and of the high standard of individual duty which they set for others, and typified in themselves,” (Richards, page 53). The bulk of the collection is the papers of Dr. Benjamin Rush and his son Dr. James Rush. Judge Jacob, John, Richard and William are represented, but to a much lesser degree. The other Rush family members are represented in a very limited manner. The collection contains correspondence; financial records; medical notes, lectures, and case histories; writings regarding medicine, politics, and the judicial system; and observations on colonial Philadelphia, the formation of the United States, and the new nation.
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Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania College

Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania College

Samuel George Morton papers, 1832-1862 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) of Philadelphia was a physician and natural scientist whose work focused on the craniometric studies of humans with conclusions regarding the relative intellectual capacities of the “five races.” His work had a profound influence on the development of physical anthropology in antebellum America. He also made contributions in the fields of geology, mineralogy, paleontology and natural history. This collection contains mainly the papers of Samuel George Morton. The papers date from 1832 to 1851, when Morton devoted his research efforts almost exclusively to ethnology and to the collecting of human skulls for comparative studies. The bulk of the papers consist of incoming correspondence, from 1832 to 1851, relating to ethnology and other related interests such as anthropology, craniology, paleontology and Egyptology.
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The amazing Rita Smrcka letter

The amazing Rita Smrcka letter

Samuel X Radbill papers, 1635-1987 (bulk 1800-1987) (College of Physicians):  Samuel X Radbill (1901-1987) began his medical career as a general practitioner in 1926 and became a pediatrician in 1938, when he was certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. Radbill was perhaps better known as a medical historian, and collector of bookplates and old and rare medical texts than as a pediatrician. He believed that the study of medicine’s past was useful to its practice, and he encouraged many of his professional colleagues to examine the history of their specialties. The Samuel X Radbill papers evidences Radbill’s deep and unrelenting interest in the history of medicine, particularly the history of pediatrics and dermatology, folklore, ancient medicine, medical art and medical bookplates. Of note, in the collection are three of Radbill’s personal collections related to the history of medicine: collections of pamphlets, brochures and articles; medical art and other pictorial works; and medical journals and texts–all dating from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. In addition, there are research notes, manuscripts and typescripts for articles and books written by Radbill, as well as a small group of miscellaneous personal papers, most of which relate directly to his research and writing. The collection dates from 1635 to 1987 (bulk: circa 1800 to 1985). Researchers should note, there are several languages represented in this collection, most notably English, Latin, French, German, Hebrew and Japanese.
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West Philadelphia Hospital for Women records, 1899-1932 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): Founded by Dr. Elizabeth Comly-Howell in 1889, the West Philadelphia Hospital for Women was established in order to provide a place in West Philadelphia where women could be treated by women. In 1929, the hospital merged with the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia. At the time of the merger, it was arranged that all maternity cases would be sent to the West Philadelphia Hospital, and surgical cases would be kept at the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia continued in existence until 1964 when it was absorbed by the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The collection contains Board of Manager records, Executive Committee records and historical materials.
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William W. Cadbury and Catherine J. Cadbury collection, 1893-1970 (Haverford College): William Warder Cadbury was born on 1877 Oct 15 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joel and Anna Kaighn Cadbury and he was a birthright member of the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Western District (now called the Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting). In 1911 he married Sarah. I. Manatt; she died shortly after in 1912. Then, in 1917 he married Catherine Balderston Jones and had three daughters, Jane B. Cadbury, Emma Cadbury, and Catherine C. Cadbury. From 1909 to 1941 they worked as medical missionaries in China. Their correspondence and diaries detail much of the unrest and tumultuous events that took place in China during this time. The correspondence specifically mentions Sun Yat Sen and Cheng Kai Shek as well as the general feelings of the Chinese people.

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