Family Histories and Genealogy

"Biographical Notes"

"Biographical Notes"

Albert Cook Myers collection on William Penn, 1668-1955 (Chester County Historical Society):  Albert Cook Myers (1874-1960) was a Pennsylvania historian, who dedicated his life’s work to the identification, study and organization of William Penn’s published writings and personal papers. Beginning in 1910, after securing an endorsement from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, he set out to publish The Complete Works of William Penn.  All told, Myers devoted fifty years of his life to this project. Though his publication goals were never realized, he assembled a massive and notable body of information about William Penn. To complete his studies, Myers traveled abroad and throughout the United States. As a result of his efforts, he came to be regarded as an expert on the topic and often spoke publicly on the life and times of William Penn. The Albert Cook Myers research collection of William Penn materials contains the information gathered by Myers in his pursuit to thoroughly research and publish a volume documenting the complete writings of William Penn. Researchers will find Myers’ notes, transcriptions, photocopies of documents, newspaper clippings, various author articles, first editions and other early editions of Penn’s works, picture postcards of places related to Penn, and photos and original manuscript material. The bulk of the collection is “The Manuscript” series, which focuses on Myer’s work on Penn’s own writings. Researchers should be aware that the bulk of the collection is Myers’ notes and only a small portion is original manuscript material related to Penn. The collection spans the dates of 1645 to 1960, however, the bulk of the material was collected and created by Myers from 1910 to 1960.
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Defense of the Raleigh

Defense of the Raleigh

Barry-Hayes papers, 1723-1875 (Independence Seaport Museum): John Barry (1745-1803), often credited as the Father of the American Navy, served the Continental Navy and the United States Navy for seventeen years. He and his descendents, particularly his nephew Patrick Hayes and grand-nephew Patrick Barry Hayes, became prominent members of Philadelphia society, serving as seamen, merchants, businessmen and politicians. The Barry-Hayes papers are the business, political and personal papers of John Barry and of his family, especially Patrick Hayes and Patrick Barry Hayes. The collection includes correspondence, letterbooks, diaries, logbooks, legal and financial papers related to Barry’s career in the Navy, the business ventures of the Hayes, Keen and Somers families, and their personal lives.
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Account book or scrapbook?

Account book or scrapbook?

Belfield papers (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  The Belfield papers include materials from families who lived in the Belfield mansion in Germantown, Pennsylvania from 1826 until 1984; however, the papers span 1679 to 1977. Featured individuals include William and Sarah Logan Fisher Wister, their son John Wister and his wife Sarah Tyler Boas Wister, their granddaughter Sarah Logan Wister Starr and her husband James Starr, and their great-granddaughter S. Logan Starr Blain and her husband Dr. Daniel Blain. The collection also houses papers from related individuals in the Emlen, Fisher, Hall, Lindley, Logan, Meigs, Wister, and other families. This collection includes correspondence, financial records, ephemera, photographs, scrapbooks, pamphlets, periodicals, and other items. Topics that are particularly well documented in the Belfield papers include: Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; Colonial Dames of America; the Sesquicentennial Exposition; stamp collecting; world travel during the Great Depression; twentieth century psychiatry; nineteenth-century industry and legal practice; and the genealogy of the Logan, Fisher and Wister families.
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Family letters

Family letters

Bowles family correspondence, 1922-1960 (Haverford College):  The Bowles family was deeply involved with Quaker missionary and relief work during the 20th century. In 1900, the Bowles moved to Japan under the auspices of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and managed the Friends School and established the Tokyo Friends Center. During World War II, the Bowles family moved to Hawaii and worked with war refugees. The Bowles family correspondence consists of correspondence from Gilbert and Minnie Pickett Bowles to their son Gordon Townsend Bowles from 1922 to 1932 and to Gordon Townsend and Jane T. Bowles from 1932 to 1960. This correspondence is essentially family correspondence, but also includes information regarding the Bowles’ Quaker relief work, their views on Quakerism and their day-to-day activities.
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Buffington–Marshall papers, 1707-1876 (Chester County Historical Society):  The manuscripts in the collection cover the years 1707 to 1876. The bulk of the collection is connected to two families, Buffington and Marshall. Buffington family manuscripts begin with emigrant Richard Buffington (d. 1747/8). He was married three times and his children included Ann, Ruth, Richard (d. 1741, married Phebe Grubb), Thomas, William, John, Hannah, Mary, Elizabeth, Lydia, Abigail, Joseph, and Alice. The Marshall family manuscripts originated from the family of emigrant Abraham Marshall (1669-1767) and his wife, Mary Hunt Marshall (d. 1769). Topics include: farming, botany, legal system, politics and elections, the poor, education, medicine, crime (includes murder, fornication and bastardy cases, etc.), slavery, etc.
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Colonel Richard Thomas papers, 1741-1919 (Chester County Historical Society): Richard Thomas (1744-1832) was a Revolutionary War colonel and a politician. He served in the Revolutionary War in the 5th Battalion Association despite his Quaker faith and served as an Assembly man from 1796 to 1790, as Pennsylvania Senator from 1790 to 1794, and as Congressman from 1794 to 1798. The collection dates from 1741 to 1919 with the bulk of materials dating from 1741 to 1857. The materials in the collection document the history of Chester County and the United States as well as the personal side of the Thomas family.

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Dimensions of the Hull of the U.S. Ship John Adams

Dimensions of the Hull of the U.S. Ship John Adams

Conner family papers, 1816-1903, bulk: 1832-1856 (Independence Seaport Museum): Susan Dillwyn Physick was born on June 22, 1803, in Philadelphia, the second of four children. Her parents were Elizabeth Emlen, whose family was one of the wealthiest in Philadelphia, and Philip Syng Physick, the prominent physician. In 1824 she met naval Master-Commandant David Conner, and the two married on June 25, 1828. The Conner family papers consist primarily of 23 journals kept by Susan Dillwyn Physick Conner from 1832 to 1856. The collection also includes her unfinished autobiography with amendments by her son, a scrapbook, two notebooks, two journals by her son, one journal by Philip Conner’s wife, two letters (one by Mary Lewis, one by Philip Conner), three account books, two published books owned by Susan Physick Conner, and notes and drafts by Arthur Hale, Philip Conner’s son-in-law.
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Hering Ancestors

Hering Ancestors

Constantine Hering and Calvin B. Knerr Family Papers, 1820-2003, bulk 1820-1940 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Dr. Constantine Hering (1800-1880), born and educated in Germany, immigrated to Philadelphia in 1833 and devoted his life to the study, practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States. As such, he is considered the father of homeopathy in America. Hering founded several schools and organizations devoted to teaching homeopathy, especially the North American Academy of the Homeopathic Healing Arts, aka the Allentown Academy, in 1836, and the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1848. Hering’s pupil and eventual son-in-law and professional assistant, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr, also practiced homeopathy. Knerr was integrally involved in the editing of two of Hering’s books and also devoted much time and effort to writing Hering’s biography, The Life of Hering. This collection primarily houses papers of Dr. Constantine Hering and his son-in-law, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr from 1820 to 1940. To a significantly lesser extent, the collection documents the North American Academy of the Homoeopathic Healing Arts, as well as the Hering, Knerr and Husmann families. The collection is comprised of correspondence; printed materials and publications, especially articles written by Hering; manuscripts; notes; diaries; medical school notebooks; family photographs; and other records; which evidence the life and work of Hering, Knerr and their families, as well as the practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Converse family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Four generations of the Converse family owned and operated the Christian Observer, a religious newspaper founded by Amasa Converse in 1840. Over the next several decades, the paper became the “leading newspaper in the southern Presbyterian Church, with a circulation larger than all other Presbyterian papers combined” (Converse, p. 381). Amasa’s son, Francis Bartlett Converse, and grandsons, Harry P. Converse and Francis (Frank) Bartlett Converse, Jr. worked on or were affiliated with the newspaper. His great-granddaughter, Marys Converse, became the paper’s managing editor in 1960. The Converse Family papers contains correspondence, financial and legal records, bound volumes, photographs, printed matter and other materials that document the personal and professional lives of Amasa Converse, Francis Bartlett Converse, Harry P. Converse, and Marys Converse—the dynasty that published America’s oldest religious weekly, the Christian Observer, for more than 160 years. The collection is particularly rich in material documenting the operations of the Observer from its inception in the early 1800s to its closure in 1976.
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Crane family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Dr. Paul Shields Crane and his wife Sophie (Montgomery) Crane were Presbyterian Church in the U.S. (PCUS) medical missionaries in South Korea from 1947 to 1969. At Jeonju (Chonju), Korea, they established a hospital, medical training program and nursing school, and helped raise significant funds for a needed expansion of the facility. They also worked to eradicate an epidemic of parasitic infections among the population there. Paul and Sophie also served in the Presbyterian Church’s Division of International Mission for many years, touring the globe and visiting the denomination’s medical mission stations in Africa, Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. The Crane Family papers, 1860s-1999, includes slides, photographs, subject files, administrative records, and other materials related to the work of Paul S. and Sophie Crane. The collection is particularly rich in material related to the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.’s (PCUS) twentieth century international medical missionary endeavors.
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William Dillwyn's letter to Susanna describing her mother who died when Susanna was two years old.

William Dillwyn's letter to Susanna describing her mother who died when Susanna was two years old.

Dillwyn and Emlen family correspondence, 1770-1824, bulk 1738-1819 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Dillwyn and Emlen family was joined in 1795 when Susanna Dillwyn married Samuel Emlen, Jr. Both the Dillwyn and Emlen families were prominent in early America as Quakers and advocates for abolition. This collection consists of six disbound volumes of letters written to and from William Dillwyn of London and his daughter Susanna Dillwyn in America from 1770 to 1795; and thereafter until 1818, to and from Susanna and her husband Samuel Emlen, Jr. of Burlington County, New Jersey. Although Susanna lived almost her entire life apart from her father, their letters are frequent and deal primarily with family matters and kin. However, there is frequent comment concerning such topics as yellow fever; abolitionism and slavery; Native Americans; breast cancer; and American and European politics, including the Napoleonic wars and the embargo, as well as their effects upon trade and merchants in Philadelphia and London.
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Family photographs

Family photographs

Jean Scobie Davis papers, 1892-1985 (Bryn Mawr College):  Jean Scobie Davis, a 1914 graduate of Bryn Mawr College, taught economics and sociology at Agnes Scott College, Vassar College, Pierce College, Wells College and the American Women’s College in Beirut. A lifetime interest in prison reform resulted in her work at the New York State Correctional Facility in Bedford Hills, New York. The Jean Scobie Davis papers is a collection consisting largely of Jean Scobie Davis’ diaries and correspondence covering nearly all stages of her life. The collection, which dates from 1892 to 1985, is divided into seven subseries: “Autobiographical Material;” “Correspondence;” “Diaries;” “Family History;” “Photographs;” “Prison Reform;” and “Scrapbooks and Guestbook.” Material found in the collection is diverse, and consists of letters, reports, bound diaries as well as loose diary pages, photographs, scrapbooks, and handwritten notes.
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Charles Lennig's identity papers

Charles Lennig's identity papers

Lennig family papers, 1803-1859 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): The Lennig family immigrated to the United States from their native France in 1813. Nicholas Lenning (d. 1835), with his wife Elise de Boulignez, settled in Philadelphia and started a business, Nicholas Lennig and Company. Over the years, the business’s name changed to Tacony Chemical Works and C & F Lennig, reflecting the involvement of Lennig’s son, Charles, and his nephew, Frederick Lennig. The Lennig family papers houses a small collection of correspondence and other records, dating from 1803 to 1859; the period of time just before and after the Lennigs left France for Germany and, eventually, Philadelphia. A majority of the papers in the collection are written in French, but researchers will also find some Latin and German.
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"For my Posterity"

"For my Posterity"

Logan family papers, 1640-1770, bulk 1767-1769 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Logan family was prominent in Philadelphia from the start of the province, serving the people in many capacities, including political, medical and literary. This is a collection of manuscripts obtained by the Library Company of Philadelphia that relates to the Logan family. The collection includes papers of the Logan family members Albanus Charles, Algernon Sydney, Deborah Norris, William Jr., and James as well as family materials collected by Frances A. Logan and William Logan Fox. The collection dates from 1684 to 1925 and consists of family papers, correspondence, diaries, writings, medical texts, lecture notes, financial records, poetry, visiting cards, and invitations.
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Family information

Family information

Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Logan family was a prominent Philadelphia family dating back to 1699, when James Logan, the family patriarch, arrived in Philadelphia to serve as the first secretary of the Pennsylvania colony. Through work in agriculture and politics, Logan and his descendants were intimately involved in the development of the Pennsylvania colony and, later, the fledging United States. James Logan’s prominence resulted in connections, both professional and familial, with other prominent colonial families, including the Norris and Dickinson families. The Logan family papers, 1638-1964 (bulk 1670-1872), documents James Logan’s personal and professional life, as well as that of several generations of his descendents. There are papers documenting the lives of his son William, his grandson George Logan, his great-grandsons Albanus Charles Logan and Algernon Sydney Logan, and the subsequent relationships with the Dickinson and Norris families. John Dickinson, who married one of James Logan’s descendents, is well documented in this collection as are his activities with the Pennsylvania and Delaware governments and his legal practice. This collection is rich in the history of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Delaware, the formation of the colony of Pennsylvania, the relationship of early colonials with the Native Americans, the bid for independence and the later formation of the United States of America. Included in the papers are correspondence, legal records, estate records, financial records, land and property records, diaries, and writings. Not only are prominent political figures (James Logan, George Logan, and John Dickinson) well documented in this collection, but women are also well documented, largely thanks to Deborah Norris Logan who kept a diary for most of her adult life. Her diaries and letters and those of some of her female relations reveal a glimpse into the lives of educated and prominent women in the Philadelphia area during the 18th and 19th centuries.
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Sketch of the life and work of Joseph S. Longshore

Sketch of the life and work of Joseph S. Longshore

Longshore family papers, 1819-1902 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center):  The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women’s education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence.
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Miller-Dickey family papers, 1786-1992 (Chester County Historical Society): This collection consists of papers of the Cross, Dickey, and Miller families of Chester County, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Maryland. John Miller and his wife, Margaret, emigrated from Scotland to Pennsylvania with their young daughter, Jane, in 1786. Miller, who was trained as a stone cutter in Scotland, developed a thriving marble business in Philadelphia; he also owned a farm in Great Valley, Pennsylvania. John was active in the Philadelphia community; he was an early member of the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society, and a supporter of the Magdalene and Missionary Societies. The papers in this collection consist primarily of personal correspondence, business records, genealogical notes, diaries, and family photographs, of the Cross, Dickey and Miller families. The collection is particularly strong on relationships between women, family health, Presbyterian church, the history of Oxford, Pennsylvania, marble cutting business, and the genealogy of the Miller, Dickey, and Cross families.
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Invoice of Sundry Goods

Invoice of Sundry Goods

Ogden and Cuthbert family papers, 1750-1906 (Independence Seaport Museum): The Odgen and Cuthbert families joined when Anthony Cuthbert (1751-1832) married Mary Ogden (1770-1862) in 1799. Both families had strong connections to the rivers of Philadelphia. The Ogden and Cuthbert family papers consist largely of financial records (receipt, invoice and account books) of Joseph Ogden, his son George, and his son-in-law Anthony Cuthbert.
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Family photographs

Family photographs

Olivia Stokes Hatch papers, 1859-1993 (Bryn Mawr College):  The Olivia Stokes Hatch papers reveal the relief work of women during the early 20th century, as well as family relationships, largely illustrated through extensive family correspondence. Olivia Stokes Hatch (1908-1983) was born in New Haven, CT and attended Bryn Mawr College from 1925 to 1930. Prior to her marriage she was very active with the American Red Cross and American Conferences of Social Work. In 1939, Olivia Phelps Stokes married John Davis Hatch, Jr. an art collector, consultant, and museum director. They had four children: John Davis Hatch III, Daniel Lindley Hatch, James Stokes Hatch, and Sarah Stokes Hatch. Anna V.S. Mitchell, the sister of Caroline Mitchell Phelps Stokes, and the aunt of Olivia Stokes Hatch, spent most of her life engaged in relief work. Her career began in 1915 in Serbia and ended in 1936 in Constantinople. The Olivia Stokes Hatch papers, 1859 to 1993, is a collection that consists largely of correspondence between the Phelps, Stokes, Mitchell, and Hatch families. The collection also includes photographs, essays, diaries, and other printed material.
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Land papers

Land papers

Penn family papers (Historical Society of Pennsylvania): The Penn family papers house the personal and governmental records of William Penn, the proprietor of Pennsylvania, and his family. This collection, which dates from 1592 to 1960 (bulk of materials dating 1629 to 1834), consists primarily of correspondence, legal records, governmental records, surveys, deeds, grants, receipts, and account books; there are also 19th and 20th century auction catalogs and other secondary materials. This collection documents the creation of the Pennsylvania colony through records created by William Penn and his associates. The records continue beyond this and document the development of the colony through the records of Penn’s descendants. These records reveal valuable insights into Penn’s relations with American Indians, the Pennsylvania/Maryland border dispute, government framework, as well private correspondence between family members and close associates.
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Burial records

Burial records

Philadelphia Memorial Park records, 1850-1969 (Chester County Historical Society):  Philadelphia Memorial Park was established in 1929 as an independent burial ground. The graves from at least four inner-city burial grounds were relocated to Philadelphia Memorial Park during the mid-twentieth century:  United American Mechanics Cemetery, administered by the United American Mechanics and United Daughters of America Cemetery Association; German Lutheran Cemetery; Union Burial Ground; and Belvue Cemetery. This collection contains Philadelphia Memorial Park’s burial records relating to Belvue Cemetery, German Lutheran Cemetery, Union Burial Ground, and United American Mechanics Cemetery. These records were inherited by Philadelphia Memorial Park when the graves were transferred. Included in the collection are account books, burial listings, correspondence, deeds, lot records, minutes, and receipts. The collection also includes ephemera and lot purchase information for Philadelphia Memorial Park. United American Mechanics Cemetery is the best represented of the included burial grounds.
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Family photographs

Family photographs

Reinhardt, Hawley and Hewes family papers, 1762-1955 (Haverford College):  The Reinhardt, Hawley, Hewes and Meredith families are tied together through marriage and their Quaker faith across multiple generations. William Dell Reinhardt, a University of Pennsylvania graduate and doctor, married Rebecca Hawley, a teacher. They had six children: Jesse Hawley Reinhardt, Mary Bailey Reinhardt, Esther Meredith Reinhardt, Lydia Ludwig Reinhardt, Elizabeth Christina Reinhardt, and David Jones Reinhardt. David Jones Reinhardt married Anna Margaret Hewes in 1896. These individuals created the bulk of the material contained within this collection. This collection consists of correspondence; account books; certificates; diaries and household information lists; friendship books; land and insurance records; marriage certificates; miscellaneous family records; wills and estates; genealogical research; photographs; Quaker tracts and poetry; newspaper clippings; and Acts of the Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania. Before looking into the collection, a researcher should take advantage of the book, The Reinhardts and Hawleys of Chester County, PA: Lives and Letters, Also Including Related Families of Meredith, Mendenhall, Pugh, Etc. and the Hewes of Salem County, NJ, by Ann M. P. McCormack, which includes duplicated copies of much of this collection with family interpretation. Most of the letters have been transcribed which is extremely helpful as the handwriting of the Reinhardts, Hawleys, Hewes, Mendenhalls and Merediths is frequently difficult to read. This collection will be of great interest to researchers interested in Quaker families, specifically in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The collection includes a wealth of documentation of family life for over a hundred years from the late 1700s to the early 1900s.
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Read family photograph albums

Read family photograph albums

Read family papers, 1736-1896 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Read family consistently played an important role in American government and politics from the time that George Read, a Delaware resident, signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Throughout the 17th to 19th centuries, the Reads served as lawyers, judges, politicians, generals, consul-generals and foreign ministers. This collection contains the papers of four generations of the Read family of Philadelphia, consisting of John Read, Judge John Meredith Read, General John Meredith Read, and Harmon Pumpelly Read. The materials date from 1736 to 1896, with the bulk dating from 1792 to 1896, and include extensive correspondence, bills and receipts, genealogical notes, legal documents, newspaper clippings, photographs, scrapbooks and ephemera. The majority of the collection consists of General John Meredith Read’s papers relating to his family history and genealogy, correspondence, and political materials. The collection is particularly valuable in illustrating Philadelphia social life, global and local politics, as well as Civil War experiences, as it includes extensive correspondence describing first-hand accounts as well as with several key political figures during the Civil War era.
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Rosenbach family papers, 1815-1979 (Rosenbach Museum and Library): For over a century, the Rosenbach family occupied a prominent position in Philadelphia’s Jewish community. Morris (born Meier) Rosenbach Sr. (1820-1885) emigrated from Germany to the United States in 1844 and established himself as a garment merchant in Philadelphia. In 1857, Morris married Isabella H. Polock, and the two had eight children together: Hyman Polock (1858-1892), Philip Hyman (1863-1953), Morris Jr. (1865-1937), Rebecca H. (1866-1926), Adelaide (1868-1872), Moses Polock (1870-1953), Miriam (1873-1926) and Abraham Simon Wolf (1876-1952). During the twentieth century, Philip and Abraham Simon Wolf (A.S.W.) Rosenbach would gain international recognition as the owners of the famous Rosenbach Company—a firm that dealt in rare books and manuscripts as well as fine and decorative arts. The Rosenbach family papers, 1815-1979 (bulk: 1853-1955), contain correspondence, financial records, manuscripts, vital records, photographs, educational records and other materials that document the personal and professional lives of various members of the Rosenbach and Polock families. The collection is particularly rich in materials that document the personal lives of brothers A.S.W. and Philip Rosenbach.
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Letters from Julia to Benjamin Rush

Letters from Julia to Benjamin Rush

Rush family papers, 1748-1896 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Rush Family papers includes material from Benjamin Rush, physician, social activist, educator, writer and patriot; his brother Jacob Rush, lawyer, Supreme Court judge, and patriot; and Benjamin’s son James Rush, physician and Treasurer of the United States Mint. These American men were “strong characters, zealous patriots during the stirring period in which they lived, tenacious of their convictions and of the high standard of individual duty which they set for others, and typified in themselves,” (Richards, page 53). The bulk of the collection is the papers of Dr. Benjamin Rush and his son Dr. James Rush. Judge Jacob, John, Richard and William are represented, but to a much lesser degree. The other Rush family members are represented in a very limited manner. The collection contains correspondence; financial records; medical notes, lectures, and case histories; writings regarding medicine, politics, and the judicial system; and observations on colonial Philadelphia, the formation of the United States, and the new nation.
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Family photographs

Family photographs

Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers 1791-1930, bulk 1840-1882 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles family papers house the correspondence of a Quaker family who lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Woodbury, New Jersey; Wilmington, Delaware; and other surrounding areas from approximately 1840 to 1882. A majority of the letters were written to or by Sarah Cooper Tatum Hilles; her husband, John Smith Hilles; and other Tatum or Hilles family members. There is a small sampling of assorted family papers, dating from 1825 to 1901. Included, among other items, are school report cards of William Samuel Hilles from Haverford College and an 1834 memoir of Anne Cooper Tatum, Sarah Hilles’ mother. In addition, there are deeds to properties owned by the Hilles family in Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois and Pennsylvania from 1791 to 1886.
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Mother's book

Mother's book

Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers, 1824-1963, bulk 1824-1930 (Haverford College):  The Sarah Wistar Rhoads family papers indicate strong relationships and family ties that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries. Sarah Wistar Rhoads (1839-1920) married William Gibbons Rhoads (1838-1880) on November 28, 1866. At that time, the Rhoads, Gibbons and Wistar families began corresponding, the result being an outstanding collection illustrating family support, friendship and love. These papers include correspondence, financial records, diaries and journals, memorabilia, classwork and notes, copied poems, prayers, sermons and verses, memorials, genealogical research, Quaker material and photographs. Researchers interested in family papers and Quaker family dynamics, social life, and customs may find this collection extremely useful.
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Family letters

Family letters

Stevens-Cogdell-Sanders-Venning collection, 1734-1955 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Stevens-Cogdell-Sanders-Venning family papers document the development of a white family and a black prominent middle class African American family in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, beginning with the 1760s emigration of John Stevens from England to South Carolina. The materials date from 1734 to 1976 and consist of scrapbooks, ephemera, newspaper clippings, Common Prayer books, invitations, holiday cards, correspondence, business papers, and a variety of personal papers. The materials document the Stevens-Cogdell-Sanders-Venning families’ professional, family, and personal lives as well as the development of a prominent middle class African American family.
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Mother's book

Mother's book

Taylor and Nicholson family papers, 1810-1999, bulk 1869-1944 (Haverford College):  The Taylor and Nicholson family papers contain the records of these two families from the late-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. The two focal points of this collection are William Nicholson Taylor (1882-1945), and his mother, Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor (1857-1944). William graduated from Harvard in 1903 and afterwards spent considerable time abroad studying architecture. He also served as an officer in the United States Military from 1916 to 1917, and worked in diplomacy after the war. Rebecca was a noted writer and poet during this time period. The strength of this collection is the collected materials related to William’s time in the military, as well as his sketchbooks related to architecture and Harvard. Researchers interested in the works of Rebecca Morgan Nicholson Taylor or Quaker women, should also consult Rebecca’s notebook and correspondence. There is extensive correspondence between the various members of these two families from the 1880s to 1940s.
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Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633-1980 (Chester County Historical Society):  The families in the Taylor, Harris, Roman, Frazer, and Smith family papers, 1633 to 1980 (bulk 1685 to 1851) are all related by the marriage of Marianne Smith to Dr. Stephen Harris on April 14, 1833. Both sides of the lineage represented in this collection immigrated to Pennsylvania because of religious persecution in England and Ireland. As Presbyterians and Quakers, they no longer wished to live under a series of laws which forced non-Anglicans out of public office, schools and the church as well as prohibiting meetings for non-Anglican worship. These newcomers contributed to the establishment of the government and religious expression in early Chester County. The documents, covering topics such as land surveying, Native Americans, the Revolutionary War, astronomy, publishing, the iron industry, and religious persecution, provide a broad picture of early Chester County and its residents as they interacted with each other at home and in Philadelphia through business, religious, and social transactions.
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Thayer Describes Sinking of Titanic

Thayer Describes Sinking of Titanic

Thayer family collection, 1892-1986 (Independence Seaport Museum): The Thayers were a prominent Philadelphia-area family at the turn of the 20th century. John Borland Thayer, Jr. was a vice-president of the Pennsylvania Railroad when he died in the sinking of Titanic on April 15, 1912. The Thayer family collection consists of more than 700 items of ocean liner ephemera dating from 1892 to 1986, including postcards, abstracts of logs, advertisements, passenger lists, menus, deck plans, photographs, stationery and baggage tags from ships of more than 40 lines. The collection also includes one of the only extant first class passenger lists from Titanic.
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Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Please request permission from Presbyterian Historical Society to use photograph.

Vass family papers (Presbyterian Historical Society):  Three generations of the Vass family served the Presbyterian Church, both in the United States and in Congo/Zaire, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lachlan Cumming Vass I ministered in the U.S. South between 1860 and 1896. His son and grandson, Lachlan Cumming Vass II and Lachlan Cumming Vass III, both served at the American Presbyterian Congo Mission (APCM). Vass III’s wife, Winifred (Kellersberger), served with her husband at the APCM, and later published several books and articles on the history of the Presbyterian Church in the Belgian Congo/Zaire. The Vass Family papers, circa 1860s-1999, consist of published works, correspondence, subject files, photographs, lantern slides, glass negatives, and other materials that document the lives of Lachlan Cumming Vass I, Lachlan (Lach) Cumming Vass II, and Winifred (Winnie) Kellersberger Vass. The collection is particularly rich in materials that document the Vass family’s work for the American Presbyterian Congo Mission (APCM) between 1898 and 1910 and from 1940 to 1970.
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Waln family papers, 1759-1888 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania):  The Walns were a family of prominent Quaker merchants in Philadelphia. In 1774, Richard Waln, moved the family to Crosswicks, in Monmouth County, New Jersey, where he purchased “Walnford” and established a flour mill. The Waln family papers document primarily the family’s business activities. Richard Waln (1737-1808) who was engaged in the milling business in Walnford, New Jersey, also was involved with financial concerns in Philadelphia. His nephew Robert (1765-1836) was the director of the Philadelphia Insurance Company from 1804 to 1813. Robert a successful merchant, joined into a partnership with his cousin Jesse, and traded with England and the West Indies, and later with East India and China. The collection consists largely of correspondence and financial records.

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