Education

Annual Announcement of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1855-1927 (Wagner Free Institute of Science): Incorporated by William Wagner (1796-1885) in 1855, the Wagner Free Institute of Science is a natural history museum and educational institution in Philadelphia that is dedicated to providing free public education in the sciences. The Annual Announcement was published every August from 1855 to 1927 and then from 1959 until the present. It is still being published and has been little changed over the years. The Annual Announcement generally includes a list of the trustees and faculty and their research, the history of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, and a description of the types of instruction including specific lectures that were offered. The Annual Announcement of the Wagner Free Institute of Science collection contains copies of this publication from 1855 to 1927. The collection is arranged chronologically.
Explore the Annual Announcement collection using the collection guide »

Design Problems

Design Problems

Armistead Browning, Jr. papers, 1956-1987 (University of Delaware):  Born in 1938, Armistead Willis Browning, Jr., was a landscape architect, environmentalist and teacher who dedicated his life to environmental preservation and education. Browning was the founder of Turtle Creek Designs, a landscape design consulting firm in Pocopson, Pennsylvania. The firm did residential work and large-scale environmental studies. Browning worked extensively with the Brandywine Conservancy in Chadds Ford and Pocopson Township, producing landmark studies of the scenic, historical, and natural features of the Brandywine Valley Region. From 1977 until his death in 1987, Browning taught courses in landscape design and native plant horticulture at the University of Delaware, and was a member of the faculty of Longwood Gardens. His weekly column, “Notes from Turtle Creek,” appeared in The Kennett Paper. He was also an accomplished and prolific photographer of the landscape and the natural world. The Armistead Browning, Jr. papers contain the professional, teaching, and business records of a notable landscape architect and environmentalist, created over a period of twenty years. The papers chronicle Browning’s experience at three architectural firms, two main centers of education, and with numerous independent projects, symposia, and workshops. The collection provides a unique look into the activities of a prolific architect, providing insight into planning processes, design, and documentation. In addition, it reveals subjects of personal interest that greatly impacted Browning’s professional life.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Armistead Browning papers using the collection guide »

Obstetrical Catechism

Obstetrical Catechism

Bertha Van Hoosen papers, 1913-1971, bulk 1920-1950 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Bertha Van Hoosen (1863-1952), a doctor specializing in obstetrics and gynecology in Chicago, IL, founded the American Medical Women’s Association. Her collection includes correspondence, journal articles, plans for a Medical Women’s Library at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, teaching material, images, and bibliographic material regarding women in medicine. A large part of the collection concerns Van Hoosen’s interests in the National Medical Women’s Association, later the American Medical Women’s Association and the Medical Women’s Library. There are also photographic images, x-rays and illustrations of medical case studies conducted by Van Hoosen.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Bertha van Hoosen papers using the collection guide »

Obituary for Bradford

Obituary for Bradford

Bradford collection, 1847-1918 (Drexel University College of Medicine):  Dr. Thomas L. Bradford (1847-1918) was a practicing homeopathic physician in Maine, Europe and Philadelphia. While practicing and teaching in Philadelphia he served as curator for the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia. From 1896 to 1916, he collected, organized and maintained material for 35 scrapbooks of biographical information about homeopathic physicians.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Bradford collection using the collection guide »

Bulletin of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1926-1958 (Wagner Free Institute of Science): Incorporated by William Wagner (1796-1885) in 1855, the Wagner Free Institute of Science is a natural history museum and educational institution in Philadelphia that is dedicated to providing free public education in the sciences. The Bulletin was published from 1926 until 1958, and announced the results of scientific investigations under the auspices of the Wagner Free Institute of Science as well as reports of educational work.
Explore the Bulletin collection using the collection guide »

Constitution and By-Laws

Constitution and By-Laws

Chicago Woman’s Medical College/Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School records, 1870-1924, 1947 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Woman’s Hospital Medical College of Chicago was founded in 1870 by Mary H. Thompson (1829-1895) and Dr. William Heath Byford (1817-1890) in order to provide equal education opportunities for female medical students in the Chicago area. In 1879, the name of the medical school was changed to the Woman’s Medical College of Chicago; and in 1892, it was taken over by the Northwestern University and renamed the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School. Over the next ten years, financial difficulties arose and in 1902, the medical school was dismantled. The Woman’s Clinical Dispensary, “a working corps of clinical teachers and assistants” who held clinics, survived until 1907. This collection documents the Chicago Woman’s Medical College and its transitions to the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School from 1870 to 1945, with the bulk of the material created from 1870 to 1924. The collection consists of Alumnae Association material, alumnae biographies, correspondence, histories of the college, alumnae surveys, annual annoucements, reports, minutes, and correspondence, as well as limited information on the Woman’s Clinical Dispensary.
Explore the Chicago Woman’s Medical College/Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School records using the collections guide »

Educator to Give Talks

Educator to Give Talks

Douglas and Dorothy Steere collection, 1896-2003 (Haverford College):  Douglas and Dorothy Steere were prominent figures of the Quaker movement in the twentieth century, and deeply committed to the causes of peace and spiritual enrichment. This commitment is evident in their involvement with Quaker-led relief work after World War II, Quaker spiritual retreats, international diplomacy, and Dorothy’s work with the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Douglas taught philosophy at several institutions including Haverford College, and published extensively on topics in Quaker philosophy and history. This collection contains considerable material related to Douglas’s work as a writer, professor, and diplomat. Given his role as a distinguished figure within twentieth-century Quakerism, this material is also relevant to researchers interested in recent Quaker history as a whole. There is also some fascinating material produced and collected by Dorothy related to the Civil Rights movement, including a letter from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Steere papers using the collection guide »

Drexel Graduate Courses offered at Glenn L. Martin Company in Baltimore

Drexel Graduate Courses offered at Glenn L. Martin Company in Baltimore

Drexel University College of Engineering records, 1930-1990, bulk 1956-1973 (Drexel University):  The College of Engineering is among the oldest colleges at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Since its establishment in 1914, it has achieved many firsts. In 1915, it became the first school at Drexel permitted to grant a four-year degree; in 1919, it was the first to implement a cooperative education program, placing students in business, industrial and professional assignments as a component of their education; and, later, in 1925, it was the first to extend the cooperative course from four years to five. Since its institution, the College of Engineering has developed and expanded its curriculum to include undergraduate and graduate programs, and research projects. This collection houses the administrative records of the College of Engineering from 1930 to 1990, with a bulk of the materials created between 1956 and 1973. The collection is made up of reports, correspondence, manuals, meeting minutes and program proposals. Approximately a third of the collection is comprised of Dean LeRoy A. Brother’s records, which consist of correspondence related to his duties as dean from 1958 to 1969. The collection’s primary strength lies in its documentation of academic programs, curriculum and research project development. These activities are well documented in annual reports, department head and faculty meeting minutes, grant award letters, program materials, research proposals and correspondence from Brothers as well as the Office of the Dean. This collection is of great research value, offering insight into a previously unknown period of the College of Engineering’s history.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Engineering records using the collection guide »

11th Annual Square Dance

11th Annual Square Dance

Drexel University Evening College records, 1921-1993, bulk 1935-1988 (Drexel University): The Drexel Evening College was founded in 1891, as the Department of Lectures and Evening Classes within the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry, and held its first classes in 1892. A program of study geared towards working adults, it offered courses in drawing, decorative painting, modeling, woodcarving, stained glass, mathematics, bookkeeping, stenography and typewriting, chemistry, physics, shop work in wood and iron, cookery, dressmaking, millinery, physical culture, economics, English and architecture. Since its inception, the Evening College has undergone significant academic, administrative and physical transformations, adapting to accommodate an ever changing student body as well as administrative and academic agendas. This collection documents those changes as well as the more general administrative, academic, and social activities of the College from 1921 to 1993. Materials in this collection include administrative records, reports, curriculum materials, faculty records, newsletters, press and publicity records, student records, records documenting College events, and photographs.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Evening College records using the collection guide »

Alice B. Kroeger Memorial Scholarship

Alice B. Kroeger Memorial Scholarship

Drexel University Library records, 1891-2003 (Drexel University):  The Library records contains documentation of the Drexel University Library from its creation in 1891 to 2003. Drexel University Library has been housed in three different buildings; the Main Building (1891-1958), the Korman Center (1959-1982) and W.W. Hagerty Library (1983-2010). The library was also responsible for running the library school until 1962, with the exception of the years 1914 to 1922 when the library school was suspended. The documents in this collection constitute a record of the activities of the directors, the internal library departments, and the intensive planning of the form and function of the two library buildings.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Library records using the collection guide »

Louisa W. Wright's matriculation cards

Louisa W. Wright's matriculation cards

George A. Hay collection of administrative files of the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (Drexel University College of Medicine):  From 1925 to 1970, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMC) underwent significant change, adapting to both survive and prosper in a transforming society. Administrative change was brought about and explored to spark institutional growth and/or to mollify financial stress. Among the more significant events in the College’s history was the 1930 move to new and larger facilities in East Falls, and an administrative reorganization in 1942. In the 1940s and 1960s, WMC also explored the financial and administrative benefits of merging with other institutions in the Philadelphia area; Kensington Women’s Hospital and the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Jefferson Medical College. Amidst all of the change, WMC continued to honor its traditions and celebrate milestones, especially its Centennial Anniversary in 1950. In 1970, the College made the decision to admit male students for the first time and change its name to the Medical College of Pennsylvania. The George A. Hay collection of administrative files is a assemblage of records created by various administrators of the Woman’s College of Medicine from 1925 to 1965. Creators of the records include: George A. Hay, comptroller; Sarah Logan Wister Starr, president of the Board of Corporators; Vida Hunt Francis, secretary; Dr. Ellen Culver Potter, a member of the faculty as well as acting president in the 1940s; and others. In addition, there is a small sampling of very early administrative records, that are dated 1796, and from 1861 to 1928. Those files include a deed to land in East Falls in Philadelphia, report cards, correspondence and other materials. Generally speaking, the records housed in this collection evidence the day to day administration of the college, especially relating to its finances; financial planning; fund raising; future needs of the college; and a few significant landmarks in institutional history, the 1942 administrative reorganization, the 1950 Centennial Celebration, and explored institutional mergers with Jefferson Medical College, Kensington Women’s Hospital and Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the George Hay collection of administrative files of the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania using the collection guide »

Notes from Lectures

Notes from Lectures

Harold Chance papers, 1938-1964 (Haverford College):  Harold J. Chance (1898-1975) worked for peace education through the American Friends Service Committee, the Peace Caravans, the Youth Section of the Emergency Peace Campaign, the Institute of International Relations, and the Friends Peace Service from 1934-1964. Included in the Harold Chance papers are correspondence, journals, writings, mailings, reports, and materials on the Friends Peace Service. Also included are Harold Haines Brinton’s (1884-1973) lectures and course notes on topics such as history and religion, mysticism in various religions, religion and social change, and the philosophy of pacifism. Researchers will find this collection is especially rich in Quaker history, specifically relating to the discussion of the use of the Quaker voice by individual Friends’ groups, in the mid 1950s.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Harold Chance papers using the collection guide »

School-by-school analysis ...

School-by-school analysis ...

Helen Oakes papers (Temple University Urban Archives):  Helen Oakes was a nationally recognized activist for public education from the 1960s to the 1980s. Oakes was chairman of the West Philadelphia Schools Committee from 1965 to 1970, chairman of the Education Committee of the League of Women Voters in 1965, and in 1968, she wrote “The School District of Philadelphia: A Critical Analysis.” From 1971 to 1980, she was a member of the board of the Citizens Committee on Public Education in Philadelphia. She was a member of the Philadelphia Board of Education from 1982 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 she served as liaison in the educational partnership between ARCO Chemical Company and James Rhoads Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also wrote, published and distributed the “Oakes Newsletter,” from 1970 to 1989, which addressed issues affecting the Philadelphia School District. This collection contains the professional papers of Helen Oakes. The materials are for the years 1958 to 2002 and include correspondence; printed materials, such as newsletters and pamphlets; newspaper clippings; educational and statistical reports; meeting minutes; financial reports and memoranda. The materials relate to Helen Oakes’ long-term involvement with a wide-range of educational institutions and initiatives, specifically in Philadelphia. Of particular note, are significant materials related to Oakes’ research, writing and publication of the “Oakes Newsletter.”
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Helen Oakes papers using the collection guide »

Jean Scobie Davis, Student and Educator

Jean Scobie Davis, Student and Educator

Jean Scobie Davis papers, 1892-1985 (Bryn Mawr College):  Jean Scobie Davis, a 1914 graduate of Bryn Mawr College, taught economics and sociology at Agnes Scott College, Vassar College, Pierce College, Wells College and the American Women’s College in Beirut. A lifetime interest in prison reform resulted in her work at the New York State Correctional Facility in Bedford Hills, New York. The Jean Scobie Davis papers is a collection consisting largely of Jean Scobie Davis’ diaries and correspondence covering nearly all stages of her life. Material found in the collection is diverse, and consists of letters, reports, bound diaries as well as loose diary pages, photographs, scrapbooks, and handwritten notes.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Jean Scobie Davis papers using the collection guide »

John Davison, Professor

John Davison, Professor

John Davison papers, 1938-1999 (Haverford College):  John Davison was a prolific composer who taught music at Haverford College from 1959 until his death in 1999. Several of his compositions were performed and recorded by orchestras throughout the United States. Within this collection are drafts of almost all his 144 scores, as well as audio recordings of a couple dozen of his pieces. Thus any researcher interested in his work should start here. Also of note to alumni are the scores Davison saved from his students.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the John Davison papers using the collection guide »

Inhomogeneous Field Distribution

Inhomogeneous Field Distribution

Karl W. Boer papers (University of Delaware): Karl Wolfgang Böer was the Distinguished Professor of Physics and Solar Energy at the University of Delaware. A pioneer in the fields of solar cells, solar energy systems and solid state physics, Böer left his native Germany for the University of Delaware in 1962. In 1971, he established the University’s Institute of Energy Conversion, which was recently designated as a National Center of Excellence for Photovoltaic Research and Education by the U.S. Department of Energy. Böer also created SES Inc., a subsidiary of Shell Oil, and was its chairman and CEO until 1976 and its chief scientist until 1981. This collection is a supplement to the Karl Wolfgang Böer papers. The materials in this collection include a significant number of Böer’s published papers and his corresponding notes, research, and scientific calculations. Other materials include: progress reports on the “Solar One” project; International Solar Energy Society materials, including articles of incorporation, by-laws, budgets and memoranda for the American section of the society; Institute for Energy Conversion research proposals; awards bestowed in Böer’s name; correspondence and teaching material from Böer’s professorship at the University of Delaware. The collection also includes presentation slide sets on solar energy issues, and educational film reels. Personal material in the collection includes Böer’s autobiographical work on his experience in Germany from 1945 to 1950, as well as a biography compiled from Böer’s remembrances. Some items in the collection, particularly the material that pre-dates Böer’s move to the United States, is written in German.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Karl W. Boer papers using the collection guide »

History of the College

History of the College

Longshore family papers, 1819-1902 (Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center): The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women’s education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence.
Explore the Longshore family papers using the collections guide »

Anatolian Archaeology Lecture Program

Anatolian Archaeology Lecture Program

Machteld Mellink papers, 1938-2006 (Bryn Mawr College):  Machteld Johanna Mellink, celebrated archaeologist and professor of archaeology at Bryn Mawr College from 1949 to 1988, was born in Amsterdam, Holland in 1917. She received her BA in 1938 and MA in 1941 from the University of Amsterdam, and her PhD from the University of Utrecht in 1943. The Machteld Mellink papers cover Professor Mellink’s academic and archaeological career from the late 1950s to the early 2000s. Included in the collection are her writings and notes, photographs, publications, and a few excavation tools. Researchers interested in her academic career, as well as her work related to excavation sites such as Kızılbel, Tarsus, and Sardis, will find valuable information in this collection. However, this collection does not provide particularly strong insight into archaeological history, nor Professor Mellink’s thought process when approaching archaeological issues. Instead, this collection is mostly comprised of lecture notes, manuscripts of writings, organizational material, and works sent to Mellink by colleagues in the field.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Machteld Mellink papers using the collection guide »

Advertising Career Seminar

Advertising Career Seminar

Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women records, 1916-1984 (Bryn Mawr College):  The Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women (PCAW) was founded in 1916 by sixteen women advertising executives. The Club participated in charitable efforts, offered advertising courses, published a newsletter (Ad-Land News), and hosted social events throughout its history. These efforts garnered national recognition for PCAW as a leading advertising organization. It also won them recognition locally as an organization committed to helping the community through scholarships and charitable giving. This collection contains the records produced by PCAW from 1916 to 1984, including material related to their advertising courses, events, history, charity involvement, and meetings. The collection has several strengths, the most notable of which is its comprehensive coverage of organizational activities from 1930 to 1977. Other strengths include the number of Ad-Land News publications within the collection, as well as the event invitations, most of which exhibit graphics and fonts reflecting contemporary advertising styles. Also of note are the records of PCAW’s heavy involvement in local affairs (advertising courses, charitable efforts, etc.), which demonstrates its influence in the area.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women records using the collection guide »

Letter to B. Rush regarding his plans for education

Letter to B. Rush regarding his plans for education

Rush family papers, 1748-1876 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  The Rush Family papers includes material from Benjamin Rush, physician, social activist, educator, writer and patriot; his brother Jacob Rush, lawyer, Supreme Court judge, and patriot; and Benjamin’s son James Rush, physician and Treasurer of the United States Mint. These American men were “strong characters, zealous patriots during the stirring period in which they lived, tenacious of their convictions and of the high standard of individual duty which they set for others, and typified in themselves,” (Richards, page 53). The bulk of the collection is the papers of Dr. Benjamin Rush and his son Dr. James Rush. Judge Jacob, John, Richard and William are represented, but to a much lesser degree. The other Rush family members are represented in a very limited manner. The collection contains correspondence; financial records; medical notes, lectures, and case histories; writings regarding medicine, politics, and the judicial system; and observations on colonial Philadelphia, the formation of the United States, and the new nation.
Read the blog post about this collection »
Explore the Rush family papers using the collection guide »

The Medical Department of the Pennsylvania College

The Medical Department of the Pennsylvania College

Samuel George Morton papers, 1832-1862 (Library Company of Philadelphia):  Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) of Philadelphia was a physician and natural scientist whose work focused on the craniometric studies of humans with conclusions regarding the relative intellectual capacities of the “five races.” His work had a profound influence on the development of physical anthropology in antebellum America. He also made contributions in the fields of geology, mineralogy, paleontology and natural history. This collection contains mainly the papers of Samuel George Morton. The papers date from 1832 to 1851, when Morton devoted his research efforts almost exclusively to ethnology and to the collecting of human skulls for comparative studies. The bulk of the papers consist of incoming correspondence, from 1832 to 1851, relating to ethnology and other related interests such as anthropology, craniology, paleontology and Egyptology.
•  Explore the Samuel George Morton papers using the collection guide »

Professor and Student Works Exhibit at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Professor and Student Works Exhibit at the Free Library of PhiladelphiaRush family papers, 1748-1876 (Library Company of Philadelphia)

Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students, 1883-1992 (Free Library of Philadelphia):  The Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students covers the influential artistic career of Howard Pyle and several of his students, most notably Maxfield Parrish, Violet Oakley, and N.C. Wyeth. The collection includes a wide range of materials, which was collected and assembled by Pyle’s former student Thornton Oakley. There are tear sheets of artwork published in magazines, original illustrations, photographs, research notes, manuscripts, and correspondence. Besides Howard Pyle, artists well represented in this collection include Elizabeth Shippen Green, Jessie Wilcox Smith, George Harding, Violet Oakley, N.C. Wyeth, and a large collection of material on Maxfield Parrish. There is also a series dedicated to the children’s author and art historian, Henry Clarence Pitz, who researched and wrote The Brandywine Tradition about Pyle and his artistic influence. The collection’s primary strength is the collection of artwork by Pyle and his students, some of which is original. Oakley also compiled clippings and tear sheets of many of Pyle’s students, and organized them according to the artist’s name. This group of material would be valuable to researchers interested in tracing the careers of these artists.
•  Read the blog post about this collection »
•  Explore the Thornton Oakley collection of Howard Pyle and his students using the collection guide »

Computers and the Quality of Life

Computers and the Quality of Life

Wagner Free Institute of Science Closing Exercises Announcements and Programs, 1921-1989 (Wagner Free Institute of Science):  Incorporated by William Wagner (1796-1885) in 1855, the Wagner Free Institute of Science is a natural history museum and educational institution in Philadelphia that is dedicated to providing free public education in the sciences. This collection consists of Closing Exercises of the Lecture Season announcements from 1936 to 1983 (intermittent) and programs from 1921 to 1989 (intermittent). The announcements provide information on the following: the date, time and location of the closing exercises, the person giving the introductory remarks and awarding the certificates, the person giving the lecture, and the title of the lecture. This collection provides a record of the lectures presented at the Closing Exercises of the Lecture Season, but no lectures or details of the event are contained within the collection. This collection is an excellent resource for researchers interested in students receiving awards and the subjects these students pursued. A researcher interested in the evolution of “modern” topics in science from 1921 until 1989 may find this collection useful.
•  Explore the Wagner Free Institute of Science Closing Exercises announcements and programs using the collection guide »

William Wagner lectures, 1815-1905 (Wagner Free Institute of Science): William Wagner was a gentleman scientist and avid collector of natural history specimens. He founded the Wagner Free Institute of Science in 1855. This collection contains a series of scientific and general lectures written and delivered by William Wagner. The lectures are arranged by subject and center chiefly on conchology, geology and paleontology, and mineralogy and metallurgy; but also include lectures, for example, on education, agriculture and aesthetics.
Explore the William Wagner lectures using the collection guide »

Leave a Comment